Vintage Info – All About Vintage Lighting

Floor Lamps

Floor Lamps

Lighting designed to put directly on the floor. All vintage lighting from the 20th century. Biographies of the designers and histories of the companies. ID your vintage lamps!

Lino Tagliapietra Table Lamp

Master glass artist Lino Tagliapietra visits Centre College

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Lino Tagliapietra Table Lamp

 

Materials: Hand blown clear and white striped Murano crystal glass. Metal Socket.

Height: 28 cm / 11.02”

Width: ∅ 38 cm / 14.96”

Electricity: 1 light bulb E27, 1 x 75 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used. Preferably a silver crown/silver bowl bulb.

Period: 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Lino Tagliapietra (born 1934).

Manufacturer: La Murrina S.p.A., Via Isonzo, 26, 22078 Turate (Co). Riva Longa, 17 – Murano Venice, Italy.

Other versions: At least also made with black stripes. Small variations in size, because they are all handmade. Often used as a floor lamp.

Lino Tagliapietra

Lino Tagliapietra was born August 10, 1934 in Murano, Italy and has also worked extensively in the United States. As a teacher and mentor, he has played a key role in the international exchange of glass blowing processes and techniques between the principal American centers and his native Murano, but his influence is apparent in the whole world.

Lino Tagliapietra:
“I don’t invent anything new; I personalize something … and that makes it something that nobody has done before.”

La Murrina

The La Murrina company was founded in the 1960s as a small business started by a group of glass-worker masters. In 1974, La Murrina was bought by a family from Milan. Today they are located at Via Isonzo, 26, 22078 Turate (Co), Italy. The furnace is still on the Murano island and located at 17, Riva Longa, Murano Venice, Italy.

Black version of this table lamp made by Lino Tagliapietra 

Lino Tagliapietra Table Lamp - Lino Tagliapietra Black Striped Table Lamp

Targetti Globes Floor Lamp

Targetti’s experience in architectural lighting and in particular in museum lighting used to bring the Salone dei Cinquecento (Salon of the 500) in the Palazzo Vechio (Old Palace) back to life.

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Targetti Globes Floor Lamp

 

Materials: Chromed metal (brass and iron), white painted metal. Opaque and clear crystal glass globes. Bakelite sockets, sometimes metal sockets.

Height: 76 cm / 29.92”

Globes: ∅ 15 cm / 5.90”

Base: ∅ 30 cm / 11.81”

Electricity: 3 bulbs E14, 3 x 60 watt maximum, 110/220 volt. Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1960s, 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Targetti Sankey S.p.A., Via Pratese 164, 50145 Firenze, Italy.

Other versions: Also made as a big floor lamp (150 cm / 59.05”). Made with a black painted base and also made in brass. In the 1970s lamps were produced with a dimmer. Most lamps were made with a triple positions switch. Switches were made in the base or on the cord. The globes were used for chandeliers, wall lamps, table lamps and so on.

Targetti Sankey S.p.A.

Targetti Sankey S.p.A. was founded in 1928 by Sankey Targetti as a family business. His son Paolo was the second president of the company. Today his grandson Lorenzo succeeded Paolo in the chairmanship of the group, and Stella, his granddaughter, is the vice president of the Tuscany RegionThe company has been designing and producing indoor and outdoor architectural light fixtures ever since.

The company specializes in lighting for large exhibition spaces. For example the lights used in the Galleria dell’Accademia di Firenze (Gallery of the Academy of Florence) to illuminate the world famous statue of David, made by Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475 – 1564), were a gift by Targetti for the museum. Also the Academy of Fine Arts (Accademia di Belle Arti) in Firenze is illuminated by Targetti.

Paolo Targetti

Paolo Targetti (1937 -2010) worked for the company since 1960 and has been working on the management’s commitments with an enthusiastic activity in the field of design of lighting and communication equipment. He was president of the Targetti Sankey S.p.A. company since 1985For some years Targetti was president of the L’Accademia di Belle Arti (Academy of Fine Arts) in Florence.

Targetti was appointed President of the Industrial Association of Florence (L’Associazione industriali di Firenze) in 1987, member of the “giunta nazionale di Confindustria”, the Confederation National Council, since 1991, runner of work since 1992, president of the scuola di Scienze Aziendali, the School of Business Science in Florence from 2003 to 2010.

From 2004 to 2007 he was chairman of the National Association of Lighting Manufacturers, the L’Associazione nazionale dei produttori di illuminazioneSince 2008 he was president of the Academy of Fine Arts in Florence.

Villa La Sfacciata

In 1998 Paolo Targetti and Targetti Sankey bought the Villa La Sfacciata in Firenze, Italy.  It houses the Fondazione La Sfacciata Lighting Academy, the home of the Targetti Light Art collection, headed by Amnon Barzel.

The Foundation is dedicated to promoting lighting research, the diffusion of light culture and commissioning works of art to contemporary artists made with the use of artificial lights. The Villa La Sfacciata is located in via Volterrana 82, on the hill of Giogoli, near the Certosa di Firenze.

Many Thanks to Ger for the beautiful pictures and enthusiasm.

Roger Tallon ERCO Halogen Spots

Hommage to Roger Tallon on Youtube

Roger Tallon – 60 years design – Franceinfo – 2 hours documentary on Youtube

Roger Tallon Erco Spots - Halogen - Osram Halospot 48

Roger Tallon Erco Spots ''Micro''

Roger Tallon 9 Erco Spots toghether on a rail.

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Roger Tallon ERCO Halogen Spots
pin-spot track lighting system

 

Materials: Metal, plastic and aluminium, painted black. White metal base.

Total height: 27 cm / 10.62”

Height: 17 cm / 6.69”

Width: ∅ 7 cm / 2.75”

Electricity: A 1 QR48 Halogen, 20 watt – 12 volt can be used. Preferably a Halospot 48, made by Osram. Other 12 volt halogen lamps can be used. Works with a transformer build inside: 220 volt to 12 volt. Does not work on 110 volt. 

Period: 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Roger Tallon (1929-2011) – father of the industrial design.

Manufacturer: ERCO GmbH, Lüdenscheid, Germany.

Other versions: Lamps on rail, floor lamps, table lamps, different models. Also made in white. These lamps are intended for rail. The white base can be used for any ERCO spotlight for rail.

Roger Tallon

Designed in 1977 by the famous French industrial designer Roger Tallon, Born in Paris, 9 March 1929, died in Paris, 20 October 2011.  He created a large amount of beautiful things, the most original watches for LIP, staircases, furniture and off course the TGV, “Train à Grande Vitesse”, the high-speed train for Europe.

Roger Tallon worked for many companies, among others: Caterpillar France, DuPont, Technés, General Electric, LIP, Air France, Bata, Peugeot, Fenwick, Kodak, Salomon Group, Fluocaril, Elf, Terraillon, ERCO and so on.

ERCO

ERCO was founded in 1934 by Arnold Reininger (1907-2003), Karl Reeber and Paul Buschhaus in Lüdenscheid, Germany. The company name ERCO represents a phonetic abbreviation of the founding name “Reininghaus & Co.“.

The company is still in family ownership. During the early years, ERCO produced parts for lamps. In particular a spring-supported retracting mechanism for hanging lights.

In the 1930s the industrial production of complete luminaires was started. After the Second World War Arnold Reininger and Karl Reeber continued the company, co-founder Paul Buschhaus had died in the war.

Famous designers that worked for the ERCO company are Alois Ferdinand GangkofnerRoger TallonEttore SottsassEmilio AmbaszShiro KuramataGiancarlo PirettiDieter Witte Yves Béhar, Knud HolscherFranco ClivioNaoto Fukasawa and many others.

The company was awarded many times thanks to these great artists and the vision of the ERCO company. ERCO received 88 iF Design Awards

Erco Spots on Vintageinfo

iF Design award 1977 Erco 33 720, 33 723

Other lamps designed by Roger Tallon on Vintageinfo click here.

Roger Tallon Erco Spots ''Micro'' Floor piece

Roger Tallon Erco Halogen Spots - Metal floor piece felt

1970s Mushroom Floor Lamp

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1970s Mushroom Floor Lamp

 

Materials: White acrylic lampshade. Mat brown painted iron rod. Mat brown painted base. Bakelite socket.

Lampshade: ∅ 50 cm / 19.68”

Height: 150 cm / 59.05”

Base: ∅ 30 cm / 11.81”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 75 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1970s, 1980s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Massive, Kontich and Wommelgem, Belgium.

Other versions: Produced in several colours: white, brown, blue, red… At least also made as a table lamp and a wall lamp.

Massive

Massive was in origin a bronze foundry and they produced mainly candlesticks, crucifixes and chandeliers in Wilrijk near Antwerp, Belgium. The company was founded in 1926 by Pieter-Jozef De Jaeck. His son Eddy De Jaeck was responsible for the huge expansion of the company in the 1970s. But it were his sons, Piet and Jan De Jaeck who made Massive a true multinational. Thus, they moved production to Eastern Europe and China.

In the 1980s Massive became the leading brand in Europe. In 2002, the brothers left the company to the investment fund CVC Capital Partners, for allegedly more than 250 million euros. 
Since 2008 the company is owned by Philips and the name of the shops is changed into Light Gallery.

When the takeover by Philips was announced in November 2006 Massive commercialized more than 10.000 lighting products under brand names such as MassiveTRIO and Lirio. The group had about 5.000 employees worldwide and was active in 70 countries.

2 Lights Black & White Floor Lamp

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2 Lights Black & White Floor Lamp

 

Materials: White painted metal lampshades. Chromed rod in two parts. Black plastic parts. Black plastic base with a, iron counterweight inside. Step switch. Porcelain sockets.

Lampshades: ∅ 10 x 17 cm / 3.93 x 6.69”

Chrome Rod: 143 cm / 56.29”

Base: ∅ 24 cm / 9.44”

Electricity: 2 bulbs E27, 2 x 75 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1970s, 1980s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Massive, Kontich and Wommelgem, Belgium.

Other versions: Produced in several colours, also made as a table lamp and chandelier.

This floor lamp was in all probability produced in China. No markings on the sockets or switch and no label. The plug has the HAWA logo moulded on it. These floor lamps were also sold by other companies.

Massive

Massive was in origin a bronze foundry and they produced mainly candlesticks, crucifixes and chandeliers in Wilrijk near Antwerp, Belgium. The company was founded in 1926 by Pieter-Jozef De Jaeck. His son Eddy De Jaeck was responsible for the huge expansion of the company in the 1970s. But it were his sons, Piet and Jan De Jaeck who made Massive a true multinational. Thus, they moved production to Eastern Europe and China.

In the 1980s Massive became the leading brand in Europe. In 2002, the brothers left the company to the investment fund CVC Capital Partners, for allegedly more than 250 million euros. 
Since 2008 the company is owned by Philips and the name of the shops is changed into Light Gallery.

When the takeover by Philips was announced in November 2006 Massive commercialized more than 10.000 lighting products under brand names such as MassiveTRIO and Lirio. The group had about 5.000 employees worldwide and was active in 70 countries.

1950s Panama Style Floor Lamp

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1950s Panama Style Floor Lamp 

 

Materials: Dark grey metallic iron with iron-reinforced base, no cast iron. White painted rod. Chrome rod. Dark grey metallic iron lampshade, white painted inside. Chrome ornamental nut on top. Chrome ornamental plate on the base. Bakelite socket.

Lampshade: ∅ 30 cm / 11.81”

Max Height: 173 cm / 68.11”

Chrome Rod: 81 cm / 31.88”

White Rod: 102 cm / 40.15”

Base: ∅ 26 cm / 10.23”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 60 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1950s, 1960s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Massive, Kontich and Wommelgem, Belgium.

This witch hat floor lamp is made in the style of the famous Panama lamps designed by the Dutch Wim Rietveld in the 1950s. They were produced by Gispen, also from The Netherlands.

Massive

Massive was in origin a bronze foundry and they produced mainly candlesticks, crucifixes and chandeliers in Wilrijk near Antwerp, Belgium. The company was founded in 1926 by Pieter-Jozef De Jaeck. His son Eddy De Jaeck was responsible for the huge expansion of the company in the 1970s. But it were his sons, Piet and Jan De Jaeck who made Massive a true multinational. Thus, they moved production to Eastern Europe and China.

In the 1980s Massive became the leading brand in Europe. In 2002, the brothers left the company to the investment fund CVC Capital Partners, for allegedly more than 250 million euros. 
Since 2008 the company is owned by Philips and the name of the shops is changed into Light Gallery.

When the takeover by Philips was announced in November 2006 Massive commercialized more than 10.000 lighting products under brand names such as MassiveTRIO and Lirio. The group had about 5.000 employees worldwide and was active in 70 countries.

Acciarri

The electric parts were made by Acciarri, an Italian company. Acciarri is an Italian family name, mostly found on the east coast of the country. Nothing to be found about this company, it must be long gone. Acciarri also produced switches and other electric parts for Reggiani, the famous Italian lightning company. And many other companies, of course.

It is not so exceptional that the electrical components are Italian. Many European light producers used Italian parts.

Harvey Guzzini Clan Floor Lamp

Harvey Guzzini Clan & Small Clan

Harvey Guzzini Clan and Clan

Harvey Guzzini Bud, Flash & Small Clan

Harvey Guzzini Clan, Flash and Bud catalogue

In Germany (West Germany at that time) and the United Kingdom these floor lamps were also sold as Meblo Clan (from 1977 to 1979) two years after the end of the production.

Harvey Guzzini Meblo Clan label

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Harvey Guzzini Clan Floor Lamp

 

Materials: Acrylic and a chromed metal ring. Bakelite socket, chromed parts.

Height: 51 cm / 20.07”

Width: ∅ 46 cm / 18.11”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 100 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used. Preferably a white/opaque bulb.

Period: 1960s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Studio 6G – The intern design team of Harvey Guzzini in 1968.

Manufacturer: Harvey Guzzini, Recanati, Italy.

Other versions: Also made as pendant lamp (Bud and Bud Grande), flush mount, tall standing floor lamp (Flash) and a table lamp (small Clan only produced from 1968 to 1972). From 1976 until 1977 the base was made in metal, before it was PVC.  Colours: white, gradient brown, opaque, green, red and orange. During the years some other colours were also produced.

Made up of a shell in thermoformed methacrylate double layer, with white interior and brown degrading exterior colour, and a screen in thermoformed methacrylate white diffuser supported on a metal disc glued to the shell.

iGuzzini illuminazione

iGuzzini illuminazione was established in 1959 by Raimondo Guzzini under the name Harvey Creazioni. Harvey is derived from the famous movie ‘Harvey’ with James Stuart and the invisible rabbit Harvey from 1950.
The initial production of enameled copper objects was supplemented by decorative luminaires.
In the early sixties it became a family business when his 5 brothers joined the company. In 1962 Luigi Massoni was attracted to lead the design team. He worked for Fratelli Guzzini and Harvey Guzzini until 1976. Luigi Massoni designed many iconic lamps in that period.
The company still exists and changed the name in 1974 into iGuzzini and in 1981 to iGuzzini illuminazione.

Project year: 1968
Year of production starting: 1968
Year of production ending: 1977

Commercial code: 2232
Period: since 1968
46 x 51 cm; base in PVC

Commercial code: 2232/1
Period: 1968 – 1972
35 x 38 cm; base in PVC

Commercial code: 2232/2
Period: 1968 – 1972
46 x 51 cm; base in PVC

Commercial code: 4016
Period: 1973 – 1977
46 x 51 cm; base in PVC

Commercial code: 4017
Period: 1973 – 1977
46 x 51 cm; base in PVC

Commercial code: 4024
Period: since 1976
46 x 51 cm; base in metal.

Prototypes of this lamp were made from 1968 until 1974.

Harvey Guzzini Clan scheme

Harvey Guzzini Clan scheme 1976

Harvey Guzzini Clan 1976 white

A small Clan appears in the Belgian TV-series “Huizenjagers” (House hunters). This series is broadcast on Vier (4) since 2017.  Other lamps in this picture: the Panthella floor lamp of Verner Panton and the Kartell KD 29 table lamp, designed by Joe Colombo.

Harvey Guzzini Clan Floor Lamp - Huizenjagers 4

Harvey Guzzini Clan Floor Lamp & Small Clan Floor Lamp

Harvey Creazioni logo

Harvey Guzzini logo

iGuzzini logo

Logo used between 1959 and 1964. Inspired by the 1950 film “Harvey“, starring James Stewart.

Logo used between 1965 and 1977.  This logo was designed by Luigi Massoni.
The architect Massoni was invited to work with Harvey as the company’s art director, a move that gave further impetus to the idea of collaborating with designers.
Between 1967 and 1971, Ennio Lucini designed the catalogue tor the DH brand, under which lamps for home lighting were marketed.

Logo used from 1974 until today, designed by Advema G&R Associati. This logo embodied the company’s entire output, which was marketed under other brands such as DH, Doma and Atelier.
It was during this period that the company began making technical products. Spot and flood lights in particular.

Gepo Floor Lamp

Gepo Floor Lamp

 

Materials: Orange/brown translucent acrylic lampshade resting on an opal acrylic diffuser. White painted metal base & chromed metal parts (iron). Bakelite sockets.

Height: 170 cm / 11.81”

Lampshade: ∅ 55 cm / 18.89”

Base: ø 30 cm / 18.89”

Electricity: 3 bulbs E14, 3 x 40 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used. Not a specific one preferred. 

Period: 1960s, 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designers: Yki Nummi, Gino Sarfatti…

Manufacturer: Gepo N.V. (Naamloze Vennootschap – Limited Company), Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Other versions: Also made with a chromed base.

Gepo N.V.

Gepo N.V. was a family business founded in 1965 by the brothers Posthuma: Peter (sales director) , Jules (purchase and marketing), Archi and Rob (production). The name Gepo is derived from the Gebroeders (brothers) Posthuma.

The brothers started their business with +- 35 euro/dollar borrowed from their mother. In 1972 the company had a turnover of +- 1 million euro/dollar. It was always the intention of the company to produce affordable lamps for the middle class. The Posthuma brothers not only wanted to democratize the light business, but they also wanted to provide every lamp with a dimmer. At that time dimmers were made with a resistor; they were expensive and often broke down. The plan has never been successful. Gepo ended business somewhere in the early 1980’s.

Origin of this lamp 

This type of lamp was produced by many companies in several variations and has similarities with a design by Gino Sarfatti for his own company Arteluce; the Moon pendant lamp, model 2130 from 1969, also used in several floor lamps (see below). It also has similarities with the Kuplat (Bubbles) lamp, designed by Yki Nummi and made by Sanka Oy for Stockmann Orno, Finland.

Arteluce produced lamps like this one, but they are not documented in a published book. However, sometimes you can find them with an Arteluce label.

Source: Gino Sarfatti. Selected Works 1938 – 1973. Written by Marco Romanelli and Sandra Severi. Published by Silvana Editoriale in 2012.

Martinelli Luce from Italy, Lyktan from Sweden, Gepo (floor lamp below) from The Netherlands. In the UK it was Lumitron who produced comparable lamps designed by Robert Welch. Harvey Guzzini produced a table lamp. Many other companies made variations of this pendant lamp and floor lamp.  

Gino Sarfatti

Gino Sarfatti was born in Venice, Italy in 1912 and studied aero naval engineering at the University of Genoa. Mr. Sarfatti died at Gravedona, Como, Italy in 1984 (some sources say 1985). He founded his company Arteluce in 1935 and sold it to Flos in 1973.

Yki Nummi

Yki Nummi (1925-1984) designed a similar lamp in 1959. It was named Kuplat and was produced by Sanka Oy, today in production by Innolux.

Yki Nummi was born on October 31, 1925 in China as a child of a Finnish missionary. Later on, he studied mathematics and physics in Turku and Helsinki and afterwards he studied design at the School of Applied Arts in Helsinki from 1946 until 1950.

He worked as lighting designer for the Finnish Stockmann-Orno A.B. light factory from 1950 to 1975 and designed hundreds of light fixtures.
The best-known light fixtures are the Modern Art table lamp in 1955 and the Lokki (Sky Flyer or Flying Saucer) pendant lamp in 1960, currently manufactured by Keraplast and Innojok Oy (Innolux), both Finish companies. In Germany and The Netherlands these lamps are produced by Adelta.

Keraplast and Adelta also produces the Modern Art table lamp. Keraplast has named it the New York table lamp. The Modern Art table lamp was acquired by the MoMA museum in New York, for their collection as a modern European Design Product of 1958, and that’s how the lamp got it’s name.

Yki Nummi participated in a large number of exhibitions and fairs. His works were awarded gold medals at the Milan Triennials of 1954, 1957 and 1960. He received the Pro Finlandia medal in 1971. Nummi also designed spotlights for the world-exhibition in 1958 in Brussels, Belgium.

Yki Nummi summarized his vision by saying ”People don’t buy lamps, they buy light”.

Yki Nummi is deceased in Finland, only 58 years old on March 12, 1984.

Stockmann-Orno and Sanka Oy

The acrylic lamps of Stockmann-Orno were made by Sanka Oy, founded in 1950. The company focused on the design of acrylic plastic, which was a new material at this time. Sanka still exists but since the 1970s they produce showers.

Stockmann-Orno A.B. was a major lighting factory, founded in 1921 in Helsinki and moved to Kerava in 1937. Later the name changed in Thorn-Orno. The factory closed its business in 2001, but Thorn still exists. Today Thorn is part of the Zumtobel Group.

Arteluce Floor Lamp

Arteluce Floor Lamp

Arteluce Floor Lamp by Gino Sarfatti

Arteluce Floor Lamp - Gino Sarfatti design

Bruno Gambone Brass Table Lamp

Many thanks to Frank from Flowermountain.be for the photos and the enthusiasm.

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Bruno Gambone Brass Table Lamp or Floor Lamp

 

Materials: Brass, Bakelite socket. Fabric lampshade.

Height: 83 cm / 32.67”

Width: ∅ 50 cm / 19.68”

Base:  32 cm / 12.59”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 75 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1970s, 1980s.

Designer: Bruno Gambone (born 1936).

Manufacturer: Ceramiche Gambone di Bruno Gambone, Via Benedetto Marcello, 9, 50144 Florence, Italy.

Other versions: The design of this table lamp is also reflected in the lamps that he has made in ceramics.

Bruno Gambone

Bruno Gambone was born in 1936 in Vietri sul Mare (Vietri on the Sea), a town and comune in the province of Salerno, in the Campania region of southern Italy.

At the age of 14 he began to have his first contacts with ceramics in the workshop of his father Guido in Florence. He had a well known pottery and majolica factory named “La Tirrena“.

In 1963 Bruno moved to the USA where he was engaged in painting, sculpture, theatre and cinema. He frequented artists such as Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg and Roy Lichtenstein.

In 1968 he returned to Italy and settled in Milan. A year later, in 1969 he returned to dealing with the ceramics sector after his father Guido died. Thus he moved back to Florence to run the family business.

He is a member of the Consiglio Nazionale della Ceramica (National Council of Ceramics in Italy). He was President of the “Associazione ASNART di C.N.A.” (Italian Trade Association of Artistic Craftsmen) for a decade, of which he is now the Honorary President. In 1997 he was appointed Artistic Director of the Italian Ceramic Awards of Vietri sul Mare, were he was born.

During the years Bruno Gambone tried out many other materials such as glass, iron, bronze and brass, of which this lamp is a beautiful example.

He once declared in an interview, “We are born from earth. We are born from it and go back to it when we die. And between birth and death, there is a story made of everyday earth.”

1980s Staff Floor Lamp

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1980s Staff Floor Lamp

 

Materials: White powder coated aluminium. Black plastic parts. Bakelite socket.

Height: 152 cm / 61.02”

Width: 60 cm / 15.74”

Base: 40 cm / 12.59”

Electricity: 3 bulbs E27, 3 x 100 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred. It has a built-in dimmer and the light bulbs can be used separately.

Period: 1980s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Staff Design.

Manufacturer: Staff & Schwarz Leuchtenwerke GMBH, Lemgo, Germany.

Model number: 120037 Lampshade: 054475

Other versions: Made in slight variations and colours. Also made as a table lamp.

This lamp won the iF Design Award 1984. Discipline: Product 

Staff

Staff – Staff & Schwarz Leuchtenwerk (lighting plant) – was established by Alfred Staff and Otto Schwarz in Lemgo, (West) Germany in 1945.
Their business started as a shop for consumer goods in wood and metal as well as pesticide for controlling the Colorado potato beetle, a huge problem at that time.
Within a year they the company expanded with 15 employees and they were producing the first wrought iron luminaires. Over the next three decades, Staff was to develop into a world leader in design excellence, receiving over 200 awards for its achievements. Staff also produced lamps for other companies such as Stilnovo (Italy) and Lyfa (Denmark). In 1994 Zumtobel bought the company.

iF Design Award 1984

Many thanks to Frank from Flowermountain.be for the pictures and the enthusiasm.

1960s Nickel-Plated Floor Lamp

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1960s Nickel-Plated Floor Lamp

 

Materials: Nickel plated iron, cast-iron counterweight in base. Black painted metal lampshades, white painted inside. Some plastic parts. 2 Metal sockets.

Height: 130 cm / 51.18”

Width: 38 cm / 14.96”

Lampshade: ∅ 11,5 x 20 cm / 4.52 x 7.87”

Base: ∅ 22 cm / 8.66”

Electricity: 2 bulbs E27, 2 x 75 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1960s, 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: To be appraised.

This floor lamp/reading lamp has many similarities with the Studio floor lamp designed By Jo Hammerborg and produced by Fog & Morup. The switches of this floor lamp were replaced with 1990s switches, probably in the 90s.

Many companies produced similar lamps. This one is probably made in The Netherlands or Germany.

The most striking thing about this lamp is that it has two plugs. You find it often with lamps made by Gepo from The Netherlands, but this lamp is probably not by them. It also has a plastic crown at the top of each lamp, as you can see below.

Links (external links open in a new window)

Jo Hammerborg Studio floor lamps – Google images

1960s Nickel-Plated Floor Lamp

Boulanger Reading Floor Lamp

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Boulanger Reading Floor Lamp

 

Materials: Made of black painted brass and iron. The lampshade is painted white on the inside. Cast iron counterweight in base. White painted Bakelite socket.

Height: 143 cm / 56.29”

Width: 36 cm / 14.17”

Lampshade: 15,4 x 14 cm / 6.06 x 5.51”

Base: ∅ 22 cm / 8.66”

Electricity: 1 bulb E14, 1 x 60 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1970s, 1980s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Société Anonyme Boulanger, Liège, Belgium. (Limited company)

Other versions: Unknown. This lamp is model 5211, as labeled on the VLM Components switch.

Made in the typical black 1950s style, but produced in the late 70s, early 80s.

Boulanger

Unfortunatly, not much is known about the company. S.A. Boulanger is famous for the large amount of lamps the company produced that are designed by Gaetano Sciolari. S.A. Boulanger ended business somewhere in the early 1980s. There is nothing to be found in the Belgian Official Journal about the company/factory. The journal goes back to 1983. 

VLM Components

All the electric parts were made by VLM Components in the 1980s. The company was founded in 1945 in Buccinasco, a small village near Milan, Italy. The company became famous for the switches they produce since 1968, designed by Achille Castiglioni. This switch is model D-661. It was also designed by him. You can find the switches over here. The switches of Castiglioni are still for sale.
VLM is part of the Relco Group, founded in 1967. Today they are the owners of the brands RelcoLeuciRelco LightingVLM and Segno.

Boulanger Reading Floor Lamp - VLM Switch D-662 + S.A. Boulanger Label - Model 5211

Boulanger Reading Floor Lamp - Lampshade

Artemide Camera Terra Floor Lamp

Artemide Camera Terra Floor Lamp

 

Materials: Black painted metal, painted with wrinkle paint. Chromed rod, black painted lampshade, also painted with wrinkle paint. Some aluminium and plastic parts. Cast iron counterweight in the base.

Height: 165 cm  / 64.96”, adjustable until 200 cm / 78.74”

Lampshade: 23 cm x 10 cm / 9.05” x 3.93”

Base: ∅ 29,5 cm / 11.61”

Electricity: 1 halogen double ended light bulb R7S – J Type T3. 1 x  300 watt maximum. 110/220 volt.

Period: 1980s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Ernesto Gismondi.

Manufacturer: Artemide, Pregnana Milanese, near Milan, Italy. 

Other versions: Also made as a table lamp.

Ernesto Gismondi

Ernesto Gismondi was born in San Remo, Italy on December 25, 1931. In 1957 he graduated in Aeronautical Engineering at the Milan Polytechnic and in 1959 he gained a degree in Missile Engineering at the Professional School of Engineering in Rome.

Since the beginning of the 1960s he has been devoting to the planning and production of lighting equipment, founding Studio Artemide S.A.S., together with designer Sergio Mazza. He became established as an international designer, participating, as one of the inventors, in “Memphis”, an avant-garde movement that brought about a profound evolution in the design sector and designing many successful appliances for the Group.

Artemide

The Artemide Group is based in Pregnana Milanese, Italy. The company is best known for the Tizio desk lamp designed by Richard Sapper in 1972 and the Tolomeo desk lamp, designed by Michele De Lucchi and Giancarlo Fassina in 1986.

Designers who have collaborated with the company include Mario Botta, Sir Norman Foster, Ettore Sottsass, Enzo Mari, Neil Poulton, Karim Rashid, Giò Ponti and many others.

Relco

The dimmer was made by Relco from Buccinasco near Milan in Italy. Relco is famous for the switches they produce that are designed by Achille Castiglione (1918 – 2002) and were produced by the VLM Components company. VLM is owned by Relco.

Artemide catalogue from the early 1980s
Left to right: 1. Callimaco floor lamp, 1982, Ettore Sottsass. 2. Camera Terra floor lamp. 3. Chimera floor lamp, 1969, Vico Magistretti.

Artemide Camera Terra Floor Lamp - Artemide catalog picture

The first lamp of the Artemide company was the Alfa table lamp, designed by Sergio Mazza in 1959, in production from 1960 until today.

Artemide Camera Terra Floor Lamp - Artemide Alfa - 1959 - Sergio Mazza

Marble And Chrome Eyeball Floor Lamp

Reggiani

Goffredo Reggiani (1929 – 2004founded the company in the Italian town of Monza in 1957 and designed most of the lamps himself. In the beginning Goffredo most often used plywood and sanitized opaque glass in his designs as you can see in this example, giving his lights a Scandinavian look. Later in the 1960s and 1970s his interest shifted towards brass and chromed metal. The Reggiani company still exists.

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Marble And Chrome Eyeball Floor Lamp

 

Materials: Chromed metal. The eyeball lampshades are white painted inside. Marble base, some plastic parts. Bakelite sockets.

Height: 160 cm / 62.99”

Width: 110 cm / 43.30”

Base: ∅ 36 cm / 14.17’’

Electricity: 3 bulbs E27, 3 x 60 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1970s, 1980s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Massive, Kontich and Wommelgem, Belgium. 

Other versions: Also made with a chromed base or a black marble base. Made with many different lampshades. Also produced in a completely white painted version. These floor lamps were made with 3 or 5 lamps. During the 1980s a version with halogen spots was made. 

Similar floor lamps were produced by the Italian company ReggianiRumor has it that Reggiani produced these lamps for Massive. But there are some differences. The most striking dissimilarity is that the eyeball lampshades are different and have another connection to the rod. The black plastic center point were the swivable rods appear is made of metal at the Reggiani floor lamp: a much better quality.

Massive

Massive was in origin a bronze foundry and they produced mainly candlesticks, crucifixes and chandeliers in Wilrijk near Antwerp, Belgium. The company was founded in 1926 by Pieter-Jozef De Jaeck. His son Eddy De Jaeck was responsible for the huge expansion of the company in the 1970s. But it were his sons, Piet and Jan De Jaeck who made Massive a true multinational. Thus, they moved production to Eastern Europe and China.

In the 1980s Massive became the leading brand in Europe. In 2002, the brothers left the company to the investment fund CVC Capital Partners, for allegedly more than 250 million euros. 
Since 2008 Massive is owned by Philips and the name of the shops is changed into Light Gallery.

When the takeover by Philips was announced in November 2006 Massive commercialized more than 10.000 lighting products under brand names such as Massive, TRIO Leuchten and Lirio. The group had about 5.000 employees worldwide and was active in 70 countries.

Osram Minispot

Osram Minispot - All Models

OSRAM Profile – from the OSRAM-website

OSRAM, based in Munich, Germany, is a globally leading lighting manufacturer with a history dating back more than 100 years. The portfolio ranges from high-tech applications based on semiconductor technology, such as infrared or laser lighting, to smart and connected lighting solutions in buildings and cities. OSRAM had more than 24,000 employees worldwide at the end of fiscal 2016 (September 30) and generated revenue of almost €3.8 billion in that fiscal year. The company is listed on the stock exchanges in Frankfurt and Munich.

In 1906 the OSRAM incandescent lamp was developed by Carl Auer von Welsbach.

In 1919 AEG (Allgemeine Elektrizitäts-Gesellschaft), Siemens & Halske (S & H) and Deutsche Gasglühlicht AG (Degea, German Gas Light Company) formed a company for incandescent lamp production under the name OSRAM.

The name is derived from osmium and wolfram, two elements that were commonly used for lighting filaments at the time the OSRAM-company was founded.

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Osram Minispot

Lamp 1 – Osram Minispot 10 W 41401

 

Materials: Plastic, 220v – 6v transformer, magnet, iron parts, stainless steel.

Height: 16 cm / 6.29”

Width: 7 x 6 cm / 2.75 x 2.36”

Electricity: 1 halogen bulb Osram Halospot 48, 1 x 10 watt maximum 6 volt.

Period: 1980s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer:  Dieter Witte (1937-2008).

Manufacturer: OSRAM Light AG, Marcel-Breuer-Street, 80807 Munich, Germany.

Dieter Witte went to school at the Kunstgewerbeschule Hannover (School of Applied Arts) in the German city Hanover. He has been working as a freelance lamp designer since 1966 for different industrial companies, including Osram, Erco and Staff. Many of his projects are design classics.

This lamp won the iF Design award in 1982.

Lamp 2 – Osram Minispot II – 20 W – model 41701 

 

Materials: Plastic, 220v – 12v transformer, white painted metal or stainless-steel, magnet, iron parts.

Height: 14,5 cm / 6.29”

Width: 6,5 x 6 cm / 5.70 x 2.36”

Electricity: 1 halogen bulb Osram Halospot 48, 1 x 20 watt maximum, 12 volt.

Period: 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Osram design, the internal design team.

Manufacturer: OSRAM Light AG, Marcel-Breuer-Street, 80807 Munich, Germany.

This lamp is a model produced from the late 70s until the 1980s.

Lamp 3 – Osram Minispot II – 20 W – Model 41701 

 

Materials: Plastic, 220v – 12v transformer, white painted metal, magnet, iron parts.

Height: 14,5 cm / 6.29”

Width: 6,5 x 6 cm / 5.70 x 2.36”

Electricity: 1 halogen bulb Osram Halospot 48, 1 x 20 watt maximum, 12 volt.

Period: 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Osram design, the internal design team, in 1972.

Manufacturer: OSRAM Light AG, Marcel-Breuer-Street, 80807 Munich, Germany.

This lamp won the iF Design award in 1972.

Lamp 4 – Osram Minispot – 20 W – Model 41601 

 

Materials: Plastic, 220v – 12v transformer, stainless steel, magnet, iron parts.

Height: 13,5 cm / 5.31”

Width: 7,5 x 7,5 cm / 2.95 x 2.95”

Electricity: 1 halogen bulb Osram Halospot 48, 1 x 20 watt maximum, 12 volt.

Period: 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: OSRAM Light AG, Marcel-Breuer-Street, 80807 Munich, Germany.

All these lamps have a magnet to “glue” the light globe on to the base. It can be turned in every direction thanks to the coiled wire.

Fantastic lamps with many possibilities. Can be used as a floor lamp, a bedside lamp, a table lamp, a picture light and so on. These type of lamps were sold for more than 40 years. With some luck you can find a new one in the box in a shop.

Osram Minispot - Osram Minispot 10 W 41401 - 1982 - Dieter Witte

Osram Minispot - Osram Minispot model 41701 - 1972 - Osram Design

Osram Minispot - Osram Minispot II - Model 41701 - 1972 - Osram Design

Osram Minispot - Osram Minispot - Model 41601 - 1972

Artiforte Magneto Floor Lamp

Artiforte Magneto Floor Lamp

 

Materials: Black painted iron, chromed iron, aluminium lampshade, Bakelite socket, strong magnet.

Height (max): 168 cm – 66.14” – adjustable

Lampshade: ∅ 23 cm / 9.05

Height base: 66,5 cm / 26.18

Width base: ∅ 52 cm / 20.47

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 60 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1950s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Made after the design by Gilbert Allen ‘Gil’ Watrous in 1950.

Manufacturer: Artiforte, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

This floor lamp was produced for the first time by the American company Heifetz, when Gilbert Watrous (1918-1991) won the 1951 design competition organised by the MOMA, the Museum Of Modern Art in New York. Heifetz produced this lamp in many variations and also as a table lamp.

Artiforte

Artiforte, not to be confused with Artifort, also a Dutch company that still exists and is best known for the seats it produces designed by the famous French designer Pierre Paulin.

The firm Artiforte was a small company based in Rotterdam and active from the 1950s until the end of the 1960s. Little is known about the company, only the beautiful lamps remain. The company also produced the St46 floor lamp and the Libra floor lamp designed by Kho Liang Ie (1927-1975), a Dutch designer with a Chinese background. He is best known for designing some of the interior of the Amsterdam Airport Schiphol. 

The Magneto floor lamp was produced approximately from the mid 1950s until 1960. The round chromed metal ball contains a strong magnet and is almost glued on the tripod when placed on top of it. It smoothly turns in every direction due to the lampshade and the counterweight which are in perfect balance. It can turn in every direction and always stays stable in position.

Often attributed to H. Fillekes, but that’s not true, of course. However, he designed several lamps lamps for Artiforte, as published in several catalogues. According to some sources, he was the owner of the company.

Gilbert Allen Watrous sketch

Artiforte Magneto Floor Lamp - Catalogue

Roger Tallon ERCO Spots ”Micro”

Hommage to Roger Tallon on Youtube

Roger Tallon – 60 years design – Franceinfo – 2 hours documentary on Youtube

Used in the book “Elseviers Praktische Huis Encyclopedie” edition 1982 to illustrate a section about sound equipment. (Elseviers Practical House Encyclopedia) Elsevier is a Dutch publishing company.

Roger Tallon Erco Spots “Micro” - Elseviers Praktische Huis Encyclopedie 1982

Roger Tallon Erco Spots ''Micro'' - Floor Stand

Roger Tallon Erco Spots ''Micro'' - Felt bottom

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Roger Tallon ERCO Spots “Micro”
pin-spot track lighting system

 

Materials: Metal, black and red plastic and aluminium, painted black. Bakelite, porcelain and metal sockets.

Total Height: 38 cm / 15.74”

Height: 28 cm / 15.74”

Width: ∅ 18 cm / 7.87”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 150 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, but preferably a PAR38 reflectorlamp.

Period: 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Roger Tallon (1929-2011) – father of the industrial design.

Manufacturer: ERCO GmbH, Lüdenscheid, Germany.

Other versions: Lamps on rail, floor lamps, table lamps, different models. Also made in white.

These lamps received the iF Design Award in 1977.

Roger Tallon

Designed in 1977 by the famous French industrial designer Roger Tallon, Born in Paris, 9 March 1929, died in Paris, 20 October 2011.  He created a large amount of beautiful things, the most original watches for LIP, staircases, furniture and off course the TGV, “Train à Grande Vitesse”, the high-speed train for Europe.

Roger Tallon worked for many companies, among others: Caterpillar France, DuPont, Technés, General Electric, LIP, Air France, Bata, Peugeot, Fenwick, Kodak, Salomon Group, Fluocaril, Elf, Terraillon, ERCO and so on.

These lamps published in books:
Taschen 1000 lights Vol.2 – 1960 to present, pages 292-293.
The Complete Designers Lights II, pages 312-313.

ERCO

ERCO was founded in 1934 by Arnold Reininger (1907-2003), Karl Reeber and Paul Buschhaus in Lüdenscheid, Germany and is still in family ownership. The company name ERCO represents a phonetic abbreviation of the founding name “Reininghaus & Co.“.

During the early years, ERCO produced parts for lamps. In particular a spring-supported retracting mechanism for hanging lights, as you can see with this pendant lamp.

In the 1930s the industrial production of complete luminaires was started. After the Second World War Arnold Reininger and Karl Reeber continued the company, co-founder Paul Buschhaus had died in the war.

Famous designers that worked for the ERCO company are Alois Ferdinand GangkofnerRoger TallonEttore SottsassEmilio AmbaszShiro KuramataGiancarlo PirettiDieter Witte Yves Béhar, Knud HolscherFranco ClivioNaoto Fukasawa and many others.

The company was awarded many times thanks to these great artists and the vision of the ERCO company. ERCO received 88 iF Design Awards

Roger Tallon 9 Erco Spots

Roger Tallon Erco Spots ''Micro'' - PAR38 spots

Roger Tallon Erco Spots ''Micro''

Roger Tallon ERCO Spots ''Micro'' - iF Design award 1977 - 33 732

iF Design award 1977 - 33 212

1970s Foldable Cube Table Lamp

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1970s Foldable Cube Table Lamp

 

Materials: brown painted aluminium, aluminium reflector, metal parts, black plastic, porcelain socket.

Height (opened): 29 cm / 11.41”

Closed: 16 x 16 cm / 6.29 x 6.29”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 150 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred. For this setup a silver cup light bulb was used.

Period: 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised, but this light has many similarities with the Dado table lamp designed by Cesare Casati in the 1970s and produced by the famous Italian company Martinelli Luce.

Manufacturer: In all probability a German company. Maybe it is a lamp by Pfäffle Leuchten (Robert Pfäffle K.G. Elektrotechnische und Beleuchtungskörper- Fabrik) from Villingen-Schwenningen. The company no longer exists.

Other versions: At least also made in red, white and black.

VLM Components

The socket and wire were produced by VLM Components, also from Italy. VLM Components was founded in 1945 in Buccinasco, a small village near Milan, Italy. VLM is part of the Relco Group, founded in 1967. Today they are the owners of the brands Relco, Leuci, Relco Lighting, VLM and Segno. The company is famous for the switches they produced that were designed by Achille Castiglioni.

The plug was made by the German factory APSA (APSA Elektrotechnische Fabrik Ing. Wilhelm Sauerwein GmbH + Co. KG).

1970s Foldable Cube Table Lamp

Dado Table Lamp – Cesare Casati 

1970s Foldable Cube Table Lamp - brown

Dado Table Lamp - Cesare Casati - Martinelli Luce

1970s Foldable Cube Table Lamp - brown

1970s Foldable Cube Table Lamp

Smoked Acrylic Tube Floor Lamp

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Smoked Acrylic Tube Floor Lamp

 

Materials: Aluminium, stainless steel, white painted metal. Black painted metal bottom. “Smoked” or brown acrylic. Brass parts. White painted Bakelite socket.

Height: 52,6 cm / 21.65”

Width: ∅ 25,4 cm / 10”

Base: 33,4 x 33,4 cm / 13.14 x 13.14”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 100 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred. In this setup a yellow sugar globe light bulb is used.

Period: 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: To be appraised.

Most of the electric parts are made by the Italian VLM company. The switch is the model 475 designed by Achille Castiglioni. The plug has the name/logo NR.PO on it: nothing to be found.

Acrylic

Acrylic – Poly methyl methacrylate or PMMA and also known as acrylic glass as well as by the trade names Acrylite, Altuglas, Lucite, Oroglas, Perspex and Plexiglas is a transparent thermoplastic.

Perspex Table or Floor Lamp - plug

Perspex Table or Floor Lamp - inside

Perspex Table or Floor Lamp

Perspex Table or Floor Lamp

Dijkstra Single Globe Brown Acrylic Floor Lamp

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Dijkstra Single Globe Brown Acrylic Floor Lamp

 

Materials: Matte brown painted metal (iron) base and rod. Brown degrading acrylic lampshade, white on the inside. Bakelite socket.

Height: 171 cm / 67.32”

Lampshade: ∅ 24 cm / 9.44”

Base: ∅ 26 cm / 10.23”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 75 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Dijkstra Lampen B.V., Cruquius, The Netherlands.

Other versions: Dijkstra made numerous lamps in this “Harvey Guzzini-style”. These lamps were also made in white.

The Dijkstra company was founded in 1922 by Fokke Dijkstra in the small town Cruquius in the North-Holland province near Haarlem, not so for away from Amsterdam.

In 2011 Dijkstra had to sell the company, and it was taken over by Hala lighting, another one of the most oldest Dutch lamp factories. In 2013 Fokke Dijkstra (junior) was in a position to buy back the company his grandfather started. “Making lamps is in our genes” thus Fokke Dijkstra jr.

Today Dijkstra Lampen once again is a family business, producing custom light solutions, which complement the environmental architecture.

Links (external links open in a new window)

Dijkstra Lampen BV

Cruquius on Wikipedia

Halanederland.nl

Dijkstra lamps on Vintageinfo

Harvey Guzzini lamps on Vintageinfo

Some other Dijkstra lamps in this style

Dijkstra Single Globe Brown Acrylic Floor Lamp - Dijkstra Aladdin Pendant Light

Dijkstra Single Globe Brown Acrylic Floor Lamp - Dijkstra Circle Pendant Lamp

1960s Clamp Floor Lamp

Villa La Sfacciata

In 1998 Paolo Targetti and Targetti Sankey bought the Villa La Sfacciata in Firenze, Italy.  It houses the Fondazione La Sfacciata Lighting Academy, the home of the Targetti Light Art collection, headed by Amnon Barzel.

The Foundation is dedicated to promoting lighting research, the diffusion of light culture and commissioning works of art to contemporary artists made with the use of artificial lights. The Villa La Sfacciata is located in via Volterrana 82, on the hill of Giogoli, near the Certosa di Firenze.

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1960s Clamp Floor Lamp

 

Materials: Chromed metal, black plastic. Some metal parts. Bakelite sockets.

Height: 150 cm /59.05”

Base: ∅ 25 cm / 9.84”

Electricity: 2 bulbs E27, 2 x 60 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred, but probably intended to use with globe bulbs or spotlights. For this setup semi-globe yellow light bulbs were used: they were original to this floor lamp.

Period: 1960s, 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Targetti Sankey S.p.A., Via Pratese, 164, 50145 Firenze, Italy – attributed.

Other versions: At least also made as a table lamp. These type of clamps were used for many lamps by several companies. you can find a few examples in the links on this page.

The rod of this lamp is made of two parts, probably it was sold in the box.

Targetti Sankey S.p.A.

Targetti Sankey S.p.A. was founded in 1928 by Sankey Targetti as a family business. His son Paolo was the second president of the company. Today his grandson Lorenzo succeeded Paolo in the chairmanship of the group, and Stella, his granddaughter, is the vice president of the Tuscany RegionThe company has been designing and producing indoor and outdoor architectural light fixtures ever since.

The company specializes in lighting for large exhibition spaces. For example the lights used in the Galleria dell’Accademia di Firenze (Gallery of the Academy of Florence) to illuminate the world famous statue of David, made by Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475 – 1564), were a gift by Targetti for the museum. Also the Academy of Fine Arts (Accademia di Belle Arti) in Firenze is illuminated by Targetti.

Paolo Targetti

Paolo Targetti (1937 -2010) worked for the company since 1960 and has been working on the management’s commitments with an enthusiastic activity in the field of design of lighting and communication equipment. He was president of the Targetti Sankey S.p.A. company since 1985For some years Targetti was president of the L’Accademia di Belle Arti (Academy of Fine Arts) in Florence.

Targetti was appointed President of the Industrial Association of Florence (L’Associazione industriali di Firenze) in 1987, member of the “giunta nazionale di Confindustria”, the Confederation National Council, since 1991, runner of work since 1992, president of the scuola di Scienze Aziendali, the School of Business Science in Florence from 2003 to 2010.

From 2004 to 2007 he was chairman of the National Association of Lighting Manufacturers, the L’Associazione nazionale dei produttori di illuminazioneSince 2008 he was president of the Academy of Fine Arts in Florence.