Vintage Info – All About Vintage Lighting

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Kandem LBL Red Bakelite Desk Lamp

Kandem LBL Red Bakelite Desk Lamp model 03 14.3

 

Materials: Red Bakelite, silver painted inside the lampshade. Aluminium heatsink. The bottom of the base is made of heavy glass (counterweight). Some metal parts. White Bakelite switch. Black Bakelite socket.

Height: 23 cm / 9.05”

Lampshade: 26 x 22 cm / 10.23 x 8.66”

Base: 19 x 16 cm / 7.48 x 6.29”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 60 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1950s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: VEB Leuchtenbau Leipzig, LBL, Germany.

LBL

VEB Leuchtenbau Leipzig, LBL was founded in 1889 by Max Körting (1862-1948) and Wilhelm Mathiesen (1859-1936) as Körting & Mathiesen AG, Bogenlampenfabrik, (carbon-arc lighting for street lighting). It was one of the first lighting manufacturers in Germany.

In 1901, the company changed its name to Körting & Mathiesen AG. 13 years later, in 1914 “Kandem” was chosen as brand name and the company produced the first .

The first “design classics” of the company were desk lamps model 656 and model 679 designed by Marianne Brandt (1893-1983) and Hin Bredendieck (1904-1995) in 1928. Brandt became head of the metal workshop in Bauhaus in 1928. Kandem sold 50,000 lamps in just a few years. At the Bauhaus metalworking workshop, Brandt worked with Christian Dell, Hans Przyrembel, and Wilhelm Wagenfeld. The also popular model 937 was designed by Heinrich Siegfried Bormann.

Those who decided to initiate cooperation between the Bauhaus Dessau and K & M from 1928 to 1933 are unknown. Walter Gropius, Hannes Meyer and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe were the directors at that time. In these five years, at least 25 luminaire models have been created. Many models designed by the Bauhaus designers were manufactured and distributed until at least 1939, partly in slightly modified form.

World War II

During the period under the Nazi regime the company was nationalized and became one of the leaders in the production of household appliances. During World War II Kandem produced mainly large headlights to track down bombers. 

Mostly women, foreign and forced laborers worked in the factory at the time of liberation by American troops in April 1945. The factory equipment was partial dismantled at the end of 1945 and goes to the Soviet Union as a reparation service. Production continued under Russian direction.

VEB Lelifa

In 1948 was the repurchase of the company and founding of the state-owned company Leipziger Lichttechnische Spezialfabrik (VEB Lelifa). VEB: Volkseigener Betrieb. German for people-owned enterprise.

In the same year, the son of the founder, Fritz Körting, who had been on board since 1930, set up the company Kandem Apparate- und Leuchtenbau GmbH in Limburg an der Lahn in West Germany (Apparatus and lighting construction).

VEB Leuchtenbau Leipzig

In 1951 the reorganization or reestablishment of the state enterprise “VEB Leuchtenbau Leipzig” takes place, shortly LBL. It was the largest luminaire manufacturer in the GDR with 1100 employees.

In the late 1950s street luminaires in the form of a spoon were made. A well known design used for many streets in the GDR and the USSR.

In the 1970s a branch was opened in Berlin. It was active until the mid-1980s.

During the German unification in 1990 the company came under the management of trustees. In 1993 the company was wound-up. The company became Leipziger Leuchten GmbH.

Kandem Leuchten GmbH from Fritz Körting in Limburg an der Lahn became a member of the Dr. Fisher Group in 2010.

Designers that worked for the company were, amongst others: Marianne Brandt, Hin Bredendieck, Heinrich Siegfried Bormann, Hermann Gautel, Alfred Schäfter and Helmut Schulze.

Many thanks to Wojtek of Modernretro2012 for the beautiful pictures. You can find his shop online on Ebay over here.

Paavo Tynell Brass Floor Lamp

Paavo Tynell Brass Floor Lamp

 

Materials: Brass, Cast iron counterweight in the base. Brass and porcelain socket.

Height: 133 – 169 cm / 52.36 – 66.53”

Lampshade: 12 x 19,5 cm / 4.72 x 7.67”

Base: ∅ 20 cm / 7.87”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 75 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used. Not a specific one preferred. 

Period: 1940s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Paavo Tynell (1890-1973).

Manufacturer: Oy Taito Ab, Helsinki, Finland.

Other versions: Made in several sizes and some variations.

Paavo Tynell 

Paavo Tynell was born on 25 January 1890 in Helsinki, Finland. He started his career as a tinsmith and later as a blacksmith specializing on metal finishes. He qualified as a master craftsman in 1913.

In the same period Tynell studied at the Helsinki University of Industrial Arts, today named after another famous designer: the Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture.

Together with Eric Ehrström, Frans Nykänen, Gösta Serlachius and Emil Wickström, he started his own company Oy Taito Ab in 1918. (Taito Oy or Skill Ltd.)

At first the company created mostly metal objects, also in silver. Later in the 1930s the emphasis was on lighting. Oy Taito Ab worked with many well known Finnish architects and designers, of which Alvar Aalto is the best known. The company produced lights for all his major projects.

After the Second World War in 1947, Paavo Tynell became involved with the Finland House in New York, USA. The Finland House was a gallery-showroom, restaurant and office building.

In the US he started designing custom made lighting for hotels, department stores, offices and private residences, all with perforated and polished brass as material. All lamps continued to be produced in Finland.

The Oy Taito Ab company was sold in 1953 to another Finnish lighting company, Idman Oy. Idman Oy was a business partner they’ve been cooperating with over the years.

Paavo Tynell worked as a freelancer for the American Lightcraft Inc. and Lightolier Inc. At Lightolier he worked with their in-house designer Gerald Thurston.

Tynell continued working for Idman. He designed their most popular lamp: the “Starry Sky” perforated flush mount or ceiling lamp. Idman produced it until the late 1970s in different variations. The original one was designed in the mid 1940s for Oy Taito Ab.

Helena Tynell

Paavo Tynell was married to Helena Tynell, born Helena Turpeinen (1918-2016). Between 1946 and 1976, she was one of the most influential designers in the Riihimäki Lasi – Riihimaen Lasi Oy glass factory. She also designed several lamps for Oy Taito AbBega Leuchten  and Glashütte Limburg.

Paavo Tynell passed away in 1973 in Tuusula, Finland.

Raak Suomi Pendant Lamps

Raak Suomi Pendant Lamps (B-1137, B-1138). Designed by Tapio Wirkkala in the late 1950s. Suomi is the Finnish word for the Republic of Finland (Wikipedia – link opens in a new window). Finland is the country Tapio Wirkkala originated.

Raak Suomi Pendant Lamps - Catalogue 5 - 1962

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Chandeliers
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Pendants
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Raak Suomi Pendant Lamps

 

Materials: Hand blown crystal glass. Made up of two parts. One part in opal glass and one part in amber coloured clear glass. Bakelite sockets. Some metal parts.

Cord Length: 80 cm / 31.49’’

Height: 28 cm / 11.02”

Width: ∅ 17 cm / 6.69”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 100 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, but preferably a white/opaque or frosted one.

Period: 1950s, 1960s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Tapio Wirkkala (1915-1985).

Manufacturer: Raak, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Other versions: Made in amber, blue-green and smoked grey. Other models were made. Such as the B-1137, as you can see on the left or in the Raak catalogue here on Vintageinfo.

The glass parts of these lamps were made by iittala from Finland.

Raak 

The Dutch company Raak was founded in 1954 by Carel O. Lockhorn (18 June 1923 – 6 October 2004), a previous employee of Philips Lighting Eindhoven. Raak, which means “to hit” in Dutch, implies design which precisely “hits the nail on the head”.

Raak is best known for their organic modern design of the 1960s and 1970s which combined glass & metals for a sophisticated futuristic style.

Designers

The light company collaborated with several international designers and architects, including Bertrand BalasEvert Jelle JellesFrank Ligtelijn. Ger VosJan Jasper FayerLi HeloMaija-Liisa Komulainen. Nan PlatvoetNanny Still-MackinneyNico Kooi. Sergio AstiTapio WirkalaWillem van Oyen and many others.

Collaborations

Raak Amsterdam also collaborated with other companies. They worked with the German Peill & Putzler for the Raak Globe lamps. Peill & Putzler produced the glass. They also sold lamps made by Peill & Putzler, such as a pendant lamp designed by Aloys Ferdinand Gangkofner. For the Raak Discus the glass was made by Bega, also a German company. For the Night Club and Stalactites lamps a cooperation with the Belgian Val Saint Lambert was undertaken in the late 1950s. Raak also sold some lamps that were produced by Staff Leuchten (Staff & Schwarz Leuchtenwerke GMBH) from Germany. iittala from Finland produced the glass for the lamps that were designed by Tapio Wirkkala. Raak collaborated with many other producers of lighting.

Carel Lockhorn sold the company in 1974 to ITT but remained a director until 1977. In 1980 Raak merged with BIS Lighting from Aalsmeer, also in The Netherlands and was renamed into BisRaak. In 1986 the Raak company became independent again. The company got a business appearance and only the colors white, black and gray were still processed.

In 1999, Raak merged with Artilite B.V. and Indoor B.V. and became CLACentrum voor Lichtarchitectuur B.V. in Drachten (Center for Light Architecture). The Center for Lighting Architecture was founded by Egbert Keen. The company was declared bankrupt on 19-05-2011.

Tapio Wirkkala

Born in Hanko, Finland, June 2nd 1915, died in Helsinki, Finland, May 19th 1985.

Tapio Wirkkala designed many things, including the Markka banknotes for Finland. His famous Finlandia vodka bottle, the Ultima Thule set of drinking glasses for Iitala (and many other glasses).

He designed beautiful vases for Venini (Murano, Italy) and many other delightful objects. Mr. Wirkkala received many awards and distinctions for his numerous creations.

Raak Suomi Pendant Lamps - Tapio Wirkkala

Raak Suomi Pendant Lamps - Catalogue 5 - 1962

Raak Suomi Pendant Lamps - Catalogue 5 - 1962

1950s Oscar Torlasco Table Lamp 578

1950s Oscar Torlasco Table Lamp 578

 

Materials: Brass, black painted brass, painted with wrinkle paint. Glass optic lens. Brown painted brass. Bakelite socket.

Height: 50 cm / 19.68”

Width: 20 cm / 7.87”

Base: ∅ 10 cm / 3.93”

Electricity: 1 bulb E14, 1 x 40 watt maximum, 12 volt. 125/160/220 volt adjustable transformer built-in. Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1950s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Oscar Torlasco (1934-2004).

Manufacturer: Lumi Cripa S.R.L., Via Imperia 20 and Piazza Missori 2,  Milan, Italy.

Other versions: Made in several variations. This one is model 578. All these lamps were designed in the late 1950s, early 1960s. Some of them were produced for many years.

Oscar Torlasco

Born in Rome, Italy in 1934, Oscar Torlasco designed many beautiful lamps. The most well known are the lamps he designed for Lumi. Torlasco designed for several Italian lighting manufacturers including Esperia, Stilux and Stilkronen. Most of his designs are from the 1950s and 60s. For many lamps he uses optic lenses for spreading/diffusing the light. It is his trademark. In 1959 Torlasco won the Italian design award, the “Compasso d’Oro” (Golden Compass) for his Genova 4053 street lighting. The lamps was in production by Fabbrica Apparecchi Illuminazione Greco S.p.A.. Oscar Torlasco passed away in 2004.

Lumi

In 1944 Carlo Antonio Crippa created his “workshop” Lumi (lights). Cripa surrounded himself with the most prominent designers, such as Guglielmo Berchicci, Anselmo De SanctisPia Guidetti (Cripa), Maurizio FavettaUgo la Pietra, Giò Ponti, Prospero RasuloAlessandro ScilipotiMatteo ThunGianni Veneziano and Luciana Di Virgilio (Veneziano & Team), Mario ValliniNanda Vigo and of course Oscar Torlasco. The Lumi company always uses high quality materials.

Today the company is still a workshop where materials are shaped according to the artist’s imagination. All crafting by hand, even by using modern technology. For many crystal lamps and chandeliers Lumi produces today Swarovski is involved. The company is still in family hands and the third generation is now at the helm. Lumi is part of the Falb group. 

Many thanks to Massimiliano from Antique and Design – Special Blu for the beautiful pictures and enthusiasm.

1950s Oscar Torlasco Table Lamp 578 - catalogue picture

1950s ERCO Conical Cylinders Chandelier

1950s ERCO Conical Cylinders Chandelier

 

Materials: Some early plastic. Anodized aluminium and brass. Some plastic and metal parts. Bakelite globe in the middle. Bakelite sockets.

Rod length: 65 cm / 25.59”

Height: 50 cm / 19.68”

Width: ∅ 35 cm / 13.77”

Electricity: 5 bulbs E27, 5 x 60 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1950s, 1960s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: ERCO GmbH, Lüdenscheid, Germany.

Other versions: Several designs were used for the lampshades. Also produced as a floor lamp, table lamp and wall lamp. A flush mount with the same materials was also made, as you can see below. Another chandelier can be found here on Vintageinfo.

The lampshades are made in the style of the design by French designer Jean Royère. He used this conical design for many lamps in the 1940s and 1950s.

ERCO

ERCO was founded in 1934 by Arnold Reininger (1907-2003), Karl Reeber and Paul Buschhaus in Lüdenscheid, Germany. The company name ERCO represents a phonetic abbreviation of the founding name “Reininghaus & Co.“.

The company is still in family ownership. During the early years, ERCO produced parts for lamps. In particular a spring-supported retracting mechanism for pendant lamps.

In the 1930s the industrial production of complete luminaires was started. After the Second World War Arnold Reininger and Karl Reeber continued the company, co-founder Paul Buschhaus had died in the war.

Other famous designers that worked for the ERCO company are Roger Tallon, Ettore Sottsass, Emilio Ambasz, Shiro Kuramata, Giancarlo Piretti, Dieter Witte,  Yves Béhar, Knud Holscher, Franco Clivio, Naoto Fukasawa, Aloys Ferdinand Gangkofner and many others.

The company was awarded many times thanks to these great artists and the vision of the ERCO company. ERCO received 88 iF Design Awards

Aloys Ferdinand Gangkofner

Aloys Ferdinand Gangkofner was born in Reichenberg, Germany in 1920. He studied at the Staatliche Fachschule für Glasindustrie (State Technical College for the Glass Industry) in Zwiesel for 1934 until 1935. He worked as a freelancer for Peill + Putzler from 1953 until 1958. Several of his designs were also sold by Raak Amsterdam, but were produced by Peill + Putzler.

Later he started to work as an independent for, among others, ERCO. He was the first “real” designer that worked for the company. Gangkofner also designed lamps in the 1960s for Reininghaus & Co from Lüdenscheid, Germany which won several iFdesign awards. He died in Munich (München), Germany in 2003.

1950s ERCO Wall Lamp

1950s ERCO Flush Mount

1950s ERCO Conical Cylinders Wall Lamp

ERCO Round Plastic Flush Mount

Brass & Acrylic Tripod Desk Lamp

Brass & Acrylic Tripod Desk Lamp

 

Materials: Brass, white acrylic. Brass knee joint. Brass and porcelain socket.

Height: 22 cm / 8.66” – adjustable

Lampshade: 20 x 12 cm / 7.87 x 4.72”

Base: 15 x 12 cm / 5.90 x 4.72”

Electricity: 1 bulb E14, 1 x 40 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, But a candelabra light bulb is preferred, the bulb is part of the design.

Period: 1950s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Gebrüder Cosack, Neheim-Hüsten, Germany – attributed.

Other versions: At least also made with a mother-of-pearl shine on the white acrylic and made in black, red and beige/vanilla coloured acrylic.

This tripod desk lamp has the same electric parts as the lamps made by the Gebrüder Cosack company. It is also made in the same superb quality. A German dealer on 1stdibs suggested that it is a lamp by Gebr. Kaiser & Co. Leuchten KG from the same town, but they did not use the same parts. Other dealers say that it is an Italian lamp and even a lamp made by Stilnovo… 

Cosack

The Gebrüder Cosack (Gecos) company was founded in 1848 as a metal processing plant in Neheim-Hüsten, Germany by Egon, Friedrich and Theodor Cosack. In the beginning they made liturgical items and crosses made of brass and they also produced kerosene lamps. Later the company came to the production of electric lamps. Cosack is the oldest Neheim lamp factory.

After the Second World War Cosack pursued a modern direction. A best seller were copper lighting for restaurants. The company was declared bankrupt in 1984.

Best known designers: Wilhelm WagenfeldUrsula Stürzenhofecker, K. H. Kinsky.  

BJB

The socket of this desk lamp was made by BJB. BJB is Brökelmann, Jäger and Busse, BJB GmbH & Co. KG. The BJB company was founded in 1867 and started with petroleum lighting. The company still exists. Today they produce LED lamps, terminal blocks and connectors, lamp holders for conventional lighting and switches. They are active in the whole world. BJB GmbH & Co. KG is located on Werler Strasse 1, 59755, ArnsbergGermany.

VLM

The switch was made by the VLM Components company from Buccinasco, near Milan in Italy. Today VLM Components is owned By Relco. It is one of the biggest suppliers of switches, cords and plugs in Europe. VLM Components became famous because of the switches they produce that were designed by Achille Castiglione in 1968.

Gebrüder Cosack Brass & Acrylic Tripod Desk Lamp

Télé Ambiance Table Lamp

Télé Ambiance Table Lamp

 

Materials: Black painted metal triangular base. Painted with wrinkle paint. Black painted grill. White acrylic disc, yellow acrylic disc. Brass with porcelain socket. Gray painted metal cover of the base. Dimmer. 6 black painted ornamental screws.

Height: 23 cm / 9.05”

Width: 18 cm / 7.08”

Base: 16 x 16 x 16 cm / 6.29 x 6.29 x 6.29”

Electricity: 1 bulb E14, 1 x 40 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1950s, 1960s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Télé-Ambiance, France.

Other versions: Also made with two white discs and a gray painted base, the ornamental screws are chromed. Made in several colours (orange, red, pink, and also with a different gaze in between the two discs. A triangle and a square version also exist. Also made with a round base. Also wall lamps were made.

Télé-Ambiance

Many were sold with the text “Télé-Ambiance” engraved in the bottom. Lamps with a different base were also produced. In all probability Télé-Ambiance was the brands name. Also wall lamps were made. Below you find a different lamp with the same inscription engraved.

This lamp is typical for the late 1950s, early 1960s. There is no label present.  The plug was made by VLM Components in the 1960s but it is in all probability not original. You find this lamp with several different plugs.

These table lamps were known as TV-lamps because they were made to place on top of a black and white TV to give some contrast light. Some brands of TV’s had these lamps build-in. The Belgium SBR (Société Belge Radio) was such a company, they made it standard in every television.

It was intended to reduce the fatigue of the eyes, because everybody was watching television in the dark. All the other lamps had bright light bulbs and there were few electrical outlets in houses. Today it is an ideal bedside or table lamp.

Lamps with dimmers from that period are very rare. Dimmers were mostly to big and made of several coils. Since the 1960s the small TRIAC is used to do the same thing (triode for alternating current).

Some people say it is a German lamp. Others say it is a lamp designed by Angelo Lelii and produced by Arredoluce. Other people say it is a lamp made by Stilux, another Italian company. Also Angelo Brotto, Francese Del Lavoro and Ettore Sottsass were named. Some say Mathieu Mategot because of the gase…

Gino Sarfatti‘s chandelier number 2072 from 1953 produced by Arteluce has some similarities.

Télé Ambiance Table Lamp - 1950s - 1960s Dimmer

Télé Ambiance Table Lamp - VLM Components 1960s Plug

Télé Ambiance Table Lamp - Télé-Ambiance

Télé-Ambiance Table Lamp

Jacob Eiler Bang Pendant Lamps

Jacob Eiler Bang

Jacob Eiler Bang (1899 – 1965) was a Danish glass designer born in Frederiksberg. Bang originally studied architecture but soon changed to glass design. He joined the Holmegaard Glass Factory in 1928.

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Jacob Eiler Bang Pendant Lamps


Materials: Turquoise and opaque crystal hand blown glass. White glass on the inside (incamiciato). Bakelite sockets.

Cord Length: 60 cm / 23.62’’

Height: 41 cm / 16.14”

Width: ∅ 12 cm / 4.72”

Electricity: 1 bulb  E27, 1 x 60 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used. But preferably a white/opaque or frosted bulb.

Period: 1960s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Jacob Eiler Bang (1899 – 1965).

Manufacturer: Fog & Mørup with Holmegaard, Denmark.

Other versions: These lamps were made in several colours. The first colours were turquoise, opaque, coral and night blue.

Similar lamps were made by Base from Murano, Italy.

Incamiciato: overlay lattimo glass (= milky looking glass) with a layer of transparent coloured glass. It’s an Italian word. The technique was invented on the Murano Island of Venice.

These pendant lamps were designed by Jacob Eiler Bang in 1963 for Fog & Mørup. It was a few years before his dead. Holmegaard, another Danish company specialized in glass objects, produced the glass for Fog & Mørup.

Fog & Mørup 

Ansgar Fog (1880-1930) and Erik Mørup (1879-1972) started their business together in 1904 as a metalwork wholesaler. Two years later they moved to the capital Copenhagen. They began to focus on lighting production and over the years taking over several electrical and lighting companies. It was only in the early 1960s that Fog & Mørup really emerged as a key force in lighting design, following the company’s appointment in 1957 of Jo Hammerborg as head of design.

Important designers and architects that worked for the company are: Claus Bonderup, Torsten Thorup. Sidse Werner, Sophus Frandsen. Jørgen Bo, E.  Balslev, Peter Avondoglio. Karen Clemmensen, Ebbe Clemmensen. Hans Due and off course Jo Hammerborg himself.

In the late 1970s Fog & Mørup merged with Lyfa, another leading Danish lighting producer. In 1980 Jo Hammerborg retired. A few years later Lyfa-Fog & Mørup was taken over by Lyskær. The name changed in Lyskaer-Lyfa.

Lyskaer-Lyfa produced lights until 1991, when it was incorporated into Horn Belysning A/S of Aalstrup, which was itself taken over in 2005 by Nordlux of Ålborg and at a large extent dismantled. Another part of the company became Lightyears, today owned by Republic of Fritz Hansen.

Fase Model 520-C Desk Lamp

Fase Model 520 Desk Lamp – Catalogue 1974

Fase Model 520 Desk Lamp - Catalogue 1974

Used as a prop in the British film Made In Dagenham (2010). A dramatization of the 1968 strike at the Ford car plant in the city of Dagenham, where female workers walked out in protest against sexual discrimination.

Fase Desk Lamp - Made In Dagenham (2010)

Used as a prop in La Fôret (The Forest) from 2017. A French crime drama television series, created by Delinda Jacobs and directed by Julius Berg.

Fase Desk Lamp - La Fôret TV Series (2017)

Used as a prop in the Spanish film La Isla Mínima (Marshland) from 2014. Two homicide detectives must settle their differences to bring a murderer to justice before more young women are killed.

Fase Model 520-C Desk Lamp - La Isla Mínima (2014)

Fase Model 520-C Desk Lamp - Fase logo 70s

Many thanks to Ger for the beautiful pictures and enthusiasm.

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Fase Model 520-C Desk Lamp

 

Materials: Black lacquered metal base. Chromed arm. Black lacquered metal lampshade. Glass diffuser. Some metal parts. 2 Bakelite sockets.

Height: 43 cm / 16.92”

Lampshade: ∅ 31 cm / 12.20”

Base: ∅ 22 cm / 8.66”

Electricity: 2 bulbs E27, 2 x 60 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Luis Pérez de la Oliva.

Manufacturer: Fase, Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid, Spain.

Other versions: Fase produced many lamps in this style. This model is 520 C, the C stands for Crystal. It was made in many colours. The lamp can rotate 360 degrees on the heavy base. Also the lampshade can turn left and right.  In 1975 the price for this lamp was almost 10 euro/dollar.

Fase

The Fase company was founded by self-made man Pedro Martin and designer Luis Pérez de la Oliva in 1964, some sources say 1966. The Boomerang lamp was one of their first designs. Initially they sold their self-produced lamps to the markets in and around the capital Madrid before successfully opening a factory in Torrejón de Ardoz on the outskirts of the city.

They produced mainly lamps, but also ashtrays and other products such as office bins and coat racks.

Fase supplied many lamps to the offices of General Franco‘s dictatorial government and the Guardia Civil, some sort of military police. From 1975 on, after the death of Franco and the end of the regime, Fase started with Italian Modern and Bauhaus-inspired designs. The Spaniards were unfamiliar with this design because of the Franco regime that ruled the country with an iron fist and allowed few foreign influences.

During the 70s Fase exported lamps to Belgium, The Netherlands, LuxembourgGreat Britain, Norway, France, Italy, Germany, Portugal, United Arab Emirates, Japan, Hong Kong, Morocco, the United States and Canada. In total in more than 32 countries.

In the 1980s Fase jumped on the bandwagon of the halogen lighting. The break with tradition proved unsuccessful and ultimately contributed to the end of the business. A large fine of the Treasury in the early nineties for tax irregularities was the end for Fase. The company was officially dissolved in 1996.

Drowned, the company sold its manufacturing license to a German brand, Ma-Of, which slightly modified the original design by adding more chrome. Before these final death rattles, the partners had already separated. Luis Pérez de la Oliva had created his own brand Lupela, another flagship of Spanish design. GEI (Gabinete Estudios Industriales – Cabinet Industrial Studies) was another company that sold similar lamps. Also Massive from Belgium produced a few lamps in this style.

When the company stopped producing them abruptly, there was a lot of ‘stock’ available in the warehouses. That’s why you find relatively many lamps with a label attached. Many lamps are sold new and never used in the box (NOS – New Old Stock).

Designers that worked for the company are amongst others: Gabriel Teixidó. He designed the Iberia and Meca series and Tomás Díaz Magro, responsible for the Apolo, Minifase and Impala lamps. The most productive was Luis Pérez de la Oliva, who designed the majority of the Fase lamps.

Fase also sold lamps made by others such as the Yamada Shomei ‘Manon’ table lamp from Japan. You can find it over here on Vintageinfo. The Prisma table lamp was produced in Italy by F.A.A.I. Arredo. Also the Sinus stacking ashtray made by Helit from Germany. A design by Walter Zeischegg from 1967. You can find it here in the MoMA, New York. Fase also sold lamps from other companies.

Lamps in the movies

The Fase lamps were used as a prop in many films. Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008), Mad Man-TV series (2007-2015), Atomic Blonde (2017), Made In Dagenham (2010), La Fôret-TV series (2017), many Almodóvar films, and so on.

A similar lamp, something in between a Hillebrand lamp and a Fase lamp was used as a prop in the 1963 James Bond film From Russia With Love. A year before the Fase company was founded. The James Bond movie was partially filmed in Spain… If it is not a Fase lamp, then maybe we know where they got their inspiration.

The starship Enterprise from the Star Trek TV series (1966) has many similarities with the Fase lamps. Was Gene Roddenberry inspired by Fase or is it a coincidence?

James Bond – From Russia With Love – 1963

Fase Desk Lamp - James Bond - From Russia With Love - 1963

Used as a prop in Atomic Blonde (2017), an American action thriller spy film directed by David Leitch.

Fase Desk Lamp - Atomic Blonde (2017)

Used as a prop in Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008). The well known American action-adventure film directed by Steven Spielberg and the fourth installment in the Indiana Jones series.

Fase President Desk Lamp - Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull

Raak Chartres Blue-Green Glass Wall Lamp

Willem van Oyen Sr. at work in his factory “BEVO glasindustrie”.

Raak Chartres Wall Lamp - Willem van Oyen senior at work

Raal Chartres Wall Lamp C-1649 - Raak Catalogue

The Raak Chartres Wall Lamp was used as a prop in the French film Le Corps De Mon Ennemi (Body of my enemy) from 1976 with Jean-Paul Belmondo. Many Raak lamps together with Stilnovo and Harvey Guzzini lamps appear in this movie.  

Raak Chartres Wall Lamps in the film Le Corps De Mon Ennemi (1976)

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Raak Chartres Blue-Green Glass Wall Lamp

 

Materials: White painted metal frame. Coloured broken glass on reinforced glass. Metal sockets.

Height: 37 cm / 14.56”

Depth: 14 cm / 5.51”

Width: 24 cm / 9.44”

Electricity: 2 bulbs E27, 2 x 60 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb with an E27 screw base can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1960s, 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Willem van Oyen Sr. (1921-2004).

Manufacturer: Raak, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Other versions: Made in several sizes and also made in red with 2 E14 bulbs. Special models

Willem van Oyen Senior

Willem van Oyen Senior had a small factory that produced these lamps for Raak Amsterdam, known asBEVO glasindustrie“. They are all handmade and therefore slightly different. The Bevo company still exist today and is now owned by his son, Willem van Oyen Junior.

These large brutalist wall lamps were inspired by the stained glass windows of the famous Chartres Cathedral in France, also known as the Cathedral of Our Lady of Chartres, about 80 kilometres (50 mi) south-west of Paris.

A. Lankhorst

The handmade glass art of these wall lamps is the work of glass artist Willem van Oyen Sr. There are several references on the internet attributing them to A. Lankhorst. Lankhorst was an architect who used these wall lamps to decorate restaurant “Dijkstra” in Zwolle, The Netherlands, mentioned in the Raak Catalogue 7 from 1970 as you can see on the picture below.

Raak

The Dutch company Raak was founded in 1954 by Carel O. Lockhorn (18 June 1923 – 6 October 2004), a previous employee of Philips Lighting Eindhoven. Raak, which means “to hit” in Dutch, implies design which precisely “hits the nail on the head”.

Raak is best known for their organic modern design of the 1960s and 1970s which combined glass & metals for a sophisticated futuristic style.

Collaborations

The light company collaborated with several international designers and architects, including Bertrand BalasEvert Jelle JellesFrank LigtelijnGer VosJan Jasper FayerLi HeloMaija-Liisa KomulainenNan PlatvoetNanny Still-MackinneyNico KooiSergio AstiTapio WirkalaWillem van Oyen and many others.

Raak also collaborated with other companies. They worked with the German Peill + Putzler for the Raak Globe lamps. Peill + Putzler produced the glass. They also sold lamps made by Peill + Putzler, such as a pendant lamp designed by Aloys Ferdinand Gangkofner. For the Raak Discus the glass was made by Bega, also a German company. For the Night Club and Stalactites lamps a cooperation with the Belgian Val Saint Lambert was undertaken in the late 1950s. Raak also sold some lamps that were produced by Staff Leuchten (Staff & Schwarz Leuchtenwerke GMBH) from Germany,  and several other companies.

Carel Lockhorn sold the company in 1974 to ITT but remained a director until 1977. In 1980 Raak merged with BIS Lighting from Aalsmeer, also in The Netherlands and was renamed into BisRaak. In 1986 the Raak company became independent again. The company got a business appearance and only the colors white, black and gray were still processed.

In 1999, Raak merged with Artilite B.V. and Indoor B.V. and became CLA: Centrum voor Lichtarchitectuur B.V. in Drachten (Center for Light Architecture). Lichtarchitectuur (light architecture) was the Raak tagline from the beginning in the 1950s. The Center for Lighting Architecture was founded by Egbert Keen. The company was declared bankrupt on 19-05-2011.

Original Dutch text in the catalogues

Smeltschilderijen
Chartres: zoals kerkramen gebrandschilderd zijn, zo zijn deze glasplastieken ‘gesmeltschilderd’. Op een basis van gewapend glas is een compositie kleurglas gesmolten. Geen twee plastieken zijn hetzelfde, maar ze zijn stuk voor stuk vitaal als een schilderij uit de Cobra-school…

C-1649 hoogte 37 cm, breedte 20 cm. sprong 12 cm, 2 lampen elk tot 75W, bij voorkeur helder.

English translation:

Melt paintings
Chartres: as church windows stained, so are these glass sculptures melt painted. On a base of reinforced glass is a composite colour glass melted. No two sculptures are the same, but they are all vital like a painting from the Cobra art school …

In the price list of January 1973 these lights were sold for 159 gulden, +- 80 euro.

Restaurant Dijkstra Zwolle - Raak Chartres Wall Lamps - Architekt A. Lankhorst Junior - Catalogue picture

Raak Chartres Wall Lamp - inside, electric parts + label

Roger Tallon ERCO Halogen Spots

Hommage to Roger Tallon on Youtube

Roger Tallon – 60 years design – Franceinfo – 2 hours documentary on Youtube

Roger Tallon Erco Spots - Halogen - Osram Halospot 48

Roger Tallon Erco Spots ''Micro''

Roger Tallon 9 Erco Spots toghether on a rail.

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Roger Tallon ERCO Halogen Spots
pin-spot track lighting system

 

Materials: Metal, plastic and aluminium, painted black. White metal base.

Total height: 27 cm / 10.62”

Height: 17 cm / 6.69”

Width: ∅ 7 cm / 2.75”

Electricity: A 1 QR48 Halogen, 20 watt – 12 volt can be used. Preferably a Halospot 48, made by Osram. Other 12 volt halogen lamps can be used. Works with a transformer build inside: 220 volt to 12 volt. Does not work on 110 volt. 

Period: 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Roger Tallon (1929-2011) – father of the industrial design.

Manufacturer: ERCO GmbH, Lüdenscheid, Germany.

Other versions: Lamps on rail, floor lamps, table lamps, different models. Also made in white. These lamps are intended for rail. The white base can be used for any ERCO spotlight for rail.

Roger Tallon

Designed in 1977 by the famous French industrial designer Roger Tallon, Born in Paris, 9 March 1929, died in Paris, 20 October 2011.  He created a large amount of beautiful things, the most original watches for LIP, staircases, furniture and off course the TGV, “Train à Grande Vitesse”, the high-speed train for Europe.

Roger Tallon worked for many companies, among others: Caterpillar France, DuPont, Technés, General Electric, LIP, Air France, Bata, Peugeot, Fenwick, Kodak, Salomon Group, Fluocaril, Elf, Terraillon, ERCO and so on.

ERCO

ERCO was founded in 1934 by Arnold Reininger (1907-2003), Karl Reeber and Paul Buschhaus in Lüdenscheid, Germany. The company name ERCO represents a phonetic abbreviation of the founding name “Reininghaus & Co.“.

The company is still in family ownership. During the early years, ERCO produced parts for lamps. In particular a spring-supported retracting mechanism for hanging lights.

In the 1930s the industrial production of complete luminaires was started. After the Second World War Arnold Reininger and Karl Reeber continued the company, co-founder Paul Buschhaus had died in the war.

Famous designers that worked for the ERCO company are Alois Ferdinand GangkofnerRoger TallonEttore SottsassEmilio AmbaszShiro KuramataGiancarlo PirettiDieter Witte Yves Béhar, Knud HolscherFranco ClivioNaoto Fukasawa and many others.

The company was awarded many times thanks to these great artists and the vision of the ERCO company. ERCO received 88 iF Design Awards

Erco Spots on Vintageinfo

iF Design award 1977 Erco 33 720, 33 723

Other lamps designed by Roger Tallon on Vintageinfo click here.

Roger Tallon Erco Spots ''Micro'' Floor piece

Roger Tallon Erco Halogen Spots - Metal floor piece felt

Emil Stejnar Sputnik Flowers Chandelier

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Emil Stejnar Sputnik Flowers Chandelier

 

Materials: Brass, clear crystal glass. White painted Bakelite sockets.

Rod Length: 100 cm / 39.37’’

Height: 60 cm / 23.62”

Width: ∅ 60 cm / 23.62”

Electricity: 13 bulbs E14, 13 x 40 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred. 

Period: 1950s, 1960s, 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Emil Stejnar in the 1950s.

Manufacturer: Beleuchtungskörperfabrik und Beleuchtungsglashütten Rupert Nikoll, Vienna, Austria. ((lighting equipment factory and lighting glassworks)

Other versions: Made in several variations and sizes. Also made in chromed metal and as a flush mount.

This lamp is often named: Pusteblume or Dandelion (dandelion – taraxacum officinale). Others say Snowball chandelier. 

Rupert Nikoll

Little is known about the Rupert Nikoll factory. The company was founded in 1908 and ended business in 1986. In 1966 it moved to Ober-Grafendorf, some 70 km / 43.5 miles from Vienna. Rupert Nikoll also had a branch in Munich, Germany since 1958.

Emil Stenjar (born 1931) is the most famous designer that worked for Rupert Nikoll. He is also from Austria. He designed numerous chandeliers, wall lamps, flush mounts and mirrors. All designed in the beginning of the 1950s. They were all decorated with crystal glass flowers. In 1957, goldsmith and silversmith Stenjar moved to Sweden. He married and returned to Austria in 1968. His designs were produced for decades.

Rupert Nikoll is also known for the “Sumatra” floor lamp. Made in brass with an organic lampshade. Several lamps were produced with lampshades in this form together with organic materials such as flowers, grasses and cane. Few are left and many have disappeared due to the fragility of the lampshades. You can find a beautiful example here on Vintageinfo.

Many thanks to Frank from Flowermountain.be for the pictures and the enthusiasm.

Harvey Guzzini Galdino Table Lamp

Harvey Guzzini Galdino Table Lamp - Catalogue picture

Harvey Guzzini Galdino Table Lamp

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Harvey Guzzini Galdino Table Lamp

 

Materials: Black painted cast iron base, painted with texture paint. Black plastic cover and top (acrylic/methacrylate). Dark orange/red painted aluminium lampshade, also painted with texture paint. Chromed iron rod and 2 chromed screws. Plastic joint. Some plastic and metal parts. Bakelite socket. The lampshade is adjustable on the rod. The red lampshade can be turned in any direction.

Height: 72 cm / 28.34”

Lampshade:  32,5 x 10  cm / 12.79 x 3.93”

Base: 13 x 14 cm / 5.11 x 5.51”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 100 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Carlo Urbinati.

Manufacturer: Harvey Guzzini, Recanati, Italy, today named iGuzzini

Other versions: Made as a several different wall lamps, table lamp, clamp lamp, floor lamp. This lamp is slightly different than the final design. The wire for the lampshade starts in the back of the base instead of on top of the chromed rod. It also has no switch and the inside of the lampshade is also red.

Project Year: 1972. Produced from 1973 until 1976.

Commercial code: 8005.

Carlo Urbinati

Designer Carlo Urbinati was born and raised in Sacrofano near Rome in Italy. He has worked in a range of areas from the lighting to the auto industries. Mixing organic forms with new technologies, Urbinati gives each of his designs a very personal touch. He is best known for his bathroom furniture and jacuzzis.

Carlo Urbinati designed 2 other lamps. The Scopelite for Zumtobel together with Fabio Lenci in 1982 and a flush mount for Dizeta in the same year.

Companies he designed for are, to name the most important: Tulli E Zuccari, Elisse, Sleeping System, Teuco, Incom. Rustici, EOS, Bernini, Giessegi, Vitreouslite. Dizeta, Zumtobel, Carrara E Mata, Dress, Mobil Class. Giessegi, Bagno In, Jacuzzi. Saniplast, Fir, Hydra, Calibur. Bertoci, Crassevic, Colavene. Hidra, Ponsi, Art Ceram, Artelinea, Ponte Giulio, Vitruvit, Roca. White Stone, Cool Bath, iGuzzini and Ponsi.

His company is named Urbinati Design and it is located in Sacrofano.

Another Carlo Urbinati exists. He is one of the owners of Foscarini lighting and is also a designer. Together with Alessandro Vecchiato he designed the Folio lamp.

iGuzzini 

iGuzzini illuminazione was established in 1959 by Raimondo Guzzini under the name Harvey Creazioni. Harvey is derived from the famous movie ‘Harvey’ with James Stuart and the invisible rabbit Harvey from 1950.
The initial production of enameled copper objects was supplemented by decorative luminaires.
In the early sixties it became a family business when his 5 brothers joined the company. In 1962 Luigi Massoni was attracted to lead the design team. He worked for Fratelli Guzzini and Harvey Guzzini until 1976. Luigi Massoni designed many iconic lamps in that period.
The company still exists and changed the name in 1974 into iGuzzini and in 1981 to iGuzzini illuminazione.

Harvey Guzzini Galdino Table Lamp

Harvey Guzzini Galdino Table Lamp

Harvey Guzzini Galdino Table Lamp

Harvey Guzzini Galdino Table Lamp

Harvey Guzzini Galdino Wall Lamps

Harvey Guzzini Galdino Wall Lamp - Catalogue

Harvey Creazioni logo

Harvey Guzzini logo

iGuzzini logo

Logo used between 1959 and 1964. Inspired by the 1950 film “Harvey“, starring James Stewart.
Logo used between 1965 and 1977.  This logo was designed by Luigi Massoni.
The architect Massoni was invited to work with Harvey as the company’s art director, a move that gave further impetus to the idea of collaborating with designers.
Between 1967 and 1971, Ennio Lucini designed the catalogue for the DH (Design House) brand, under which lamps for home lighting were marketed.
Logo used from 1974 until today, designed by Advema G&R Associati. This logo embodied the company’s entire output, which was marketed under other brands such as DH, Doma and Atelier.
It was during this period that the company began making technical products. Spot and flood lights in particular.

Fibreglass Rocket Floor Lamp

Fibreglass Rocket Floor Lamp

 

Materials: 3 teak legs: tripod. Orange/yellow fibreglass tube. Brass parts, brass sockets.

Height: 113 cm / 44.48”

Width: ∅ 22 cm / 8.66”

Fibreglass Tube: ∅ 15 cm / 5.90”

Electricity: 2 bulbs B22 (bayonet fitting), 2 x 60 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of lamp can be used. Not a specific one preferred. Clear light bulbs have been used for this setup.

Period: 1950s, 1960s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer:  To be appraised.

Manufacturer:  Novoplast, Dolná Streda, Czech Republic.

Other versions: Made in several sizes, colours and versions; white, blue, green, small, big … Probably also produced with E27-sockets.

Often described as a lamp from Denmark but this type of rocket lamp was made in the Czech Republic in the late 1950s, early 1960s: the Space Age.

These lamps were made in the Czech Republic, but if you want one, you have to buy it in the United Kingdom. Most of the time when a lamp is for sale it is in the UK. That’s because Habitat sold these floor lamps in the 1960s. They are hard to find anywhere else in this version: the most beautiful one.

Novoplast

Novoplast is a company from the Czech Republic. Novoplast was founded in 1947 and is specialized in glass-fibre reinforced plastics.

Habitat

Habitat Retail Ltd, trading as Habitat is a retailer of household furnishings. Sir Terence Conran founded the company in London in 1964. The business expanded quickly and in 1973 the first store in Europe was opened in Paris, France. The company expanded and merged frequently over the years. In 2011 the company almost went bankrupt.

Used as a prop in the British film Made In Dagenham (2010). A dramatization of the 1968 strike at the Ford car plant in the city of Dagenham, where female workers walked out in protest against sexual discrimination.

Fibreglass Rocket Floor Lamp - Used as a prop in the film Made In Dagenham (2010)

Used as a prop in the BBC’s Mrs. Brown’s Boys television sitcom.

Fibreglass Rocket Floor Lamp - Used as a prop in Mrs. Brown's Boys, BBC comedy series

Aldo Nason 1970s Torpedo Chandelier

AV Mazzega Contemporary Lighting at Euroluce 2013.
Andrea Mazzega
talks about the history of the company.

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Aldo Nason 1970s Torpedo Chandelier

 

Materials: 6 hand blown Murano opaque/milky crystal glass “torpedoes”. Nickel-plated metal parts made of iron and brass. Bakelite sockets.

Rod Length: 100 cm / 39.37”

Height: 50 cm / 19.68”

Width: ∅ 38 cm / 14.96”

Electricity: 6 bulbs E14, 6 x 40 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used. Not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1960s, 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Aldo Nason (1920).

Manufacturer: AV Mazzega, Murano Italy.

Other versions: Made in several variations: more or less lamps. Made as a table lamp, floor lamp and wall lamp. One of the biggest chandeliers uses 18 light bulbs.

AV Mazzega

AV Mazzega was founded in 1946 by Angelo Vittorio Mazzega. In 1950 his son Gianni Bruno Mazzega started working in the family’s glass factory. Gianni Bruno Mazzega is responsible for the creation of many beautiful lamps.

Today, under the watchful eye of Andrea Mazzega, grandson of Angelo Vittorio, the company works together with high-level international designers. Andrea is the president of the company since 2000.

Aldo Nason

Born in Murano in 1920 he grew up in one of the oldest families of Murano glass makers where experts introduced him to the most refined techniques. He was the son of Emilio Nason, one of the founders of the Arte Vetraria Muranese or A.Ve.M. company in 1932. Co-founders were Antonio Luigi Ferro, his sons Egidio and Ottone Ferro and Galliano Ferro. In 1939 Giulio Radi joined the company as art director.

The A.Ve.M. company is best known today for their very popular “Tutti Frutti” range of bowls and vases from the 1950’s that are often wrongly attributed to designer Dino Martens. Martens never worked for A.Ve.M.

In 1937, Aldo Nason joined the company as a glass blower. His most well known design for the company is the Yokohama range of vases. In 1959 he became a partner upon the death of his father. In 1968 Aldo found a workshop of his own. Egidio Ferro‘s sons Luciano and Giulio Ferro became the sole owners of the A.Ve.M. firm. It exists to this day but it ceased production many years ago.

When Aldo Nason became independent he quickly started to collaborate with several other glass workshops such as AV Mazzega. He designed many chandeliers and lamps for the company. Many of them were designed in this “tubular” style.

Aldo Nason is the cousin of Carlo Nason. In the 1970s Carlo designed almost the complete AV Mazzega light collection.

Many thanks to Frank from Flowermountain.be for the photos and the enthusiasm. Many thanks to Robert for the information.

Gepo Orange Mushroom Table Lamp

Links (external links open in a new window)

Google Gepo lamps

Gepo lamps on Vintageinfo

Mushroom lamps on Vintageninfo

Antwerp on Wikipedia

Antwerpen-Centraal railway station on Wikipedia

In 2009 the American Newsweek-magazine judged the station to be the world’s fourth greatest train station. In 2014 the British-American magazine Mashableawarded it the first place for the most beautiful railway station in the world.

360° panorama of the station

Carnotstraat on Wikipedia (in Dutch)

White version of this lamp on Vintageinfo

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Orange Mushroom Table Lamp

 

Materials: Chromed iron, chromed brass, orange acrylic. Chromed brass, transparent acrylic cord holder and brass with porcelain sockets.

Height: 55 cm / 21.65” – adjustable

Width: ∅ 40 cm / 15.74”

Base:  18 cm / 7.08”

Electricity: 2 bulbs E27, 2 x 75 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred. But opaque or frosted light bulbs gives the best result.

Period: 1960s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Gepo N.V. (Naamloze Vennootschap – Limited Company), Amsterdam, The Netherlands. (attributed)

Other versions: Also made with a white lampshade. Some slight differences exist. For instance, the white version here on Vintageinfo has a round ornamental screw to adjust the height.

Gepo N.V.

Gepo N.V. was a family business founded in 1965 by the brothers Posthuma: Peter(sales director) , Jules (purchase and marketing), Archi and Rob (production). The name Gepo is derived from the Gebroeders (brothers) Posthuma.

The brothers started their business with +- 35 euro/dollar borrowed from their mother. In 1972 the company had a turnover of +- 1 million euro/dollar. It was always the intention of the company to produce affordable lamps for the middle class. The Posthuma brothers not only wanted to democratize the light business, but they also wanted to provide every lamp with a dimmer. At that time dimmers were made with a resistor; they were expensive and often broke down. The plan has never been successful. Gepo ended business somewhere in the early 1980’s.

The electric parts are made by the Italian VLM Components company. All electric parts were produced in the mid 1960s, so presumably also this table lamp. 

This lamp was acquired when Veduco, once a famous design shop in AntwerpBelgium, ended business in 1996. The shop was located in the Carnotstraat near the central station. In the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s a boulevard famous for all the furniture and design shops.
This lamp, together with a white one, were the last 2 lamps to be found somewhere in the basement before closing the shop.

Gepo Orange Mushroom Table Lamp

Gepo Orange Mushroom Table Lamp

Gepo Orange & White Mushroom Table Lamp

Targetti Clamp Spot Lamp

Targetti Clamp Spot Lamp - Targetti lights shining on David by Michelangelo in Florence, Italy - photo 2016

Targetti Clamp Spot Lamp - Targetti lights shining on David by Michelangelo in Florence, Italy - photo 2016

Targetti’s experience in architectural lighting and in particular in museum lighting used to bring the Salone dei Cinquecento (Salon of the 500) in the Palazzo Vechio (Old Palace) back to life.

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Targetti Clamp Spot Lamp

 

Materials: Chromed metal, plastic, Bakelite socket.

Lamp Holder: 13  x 5 cm / 5.11 x 1.96” 

Clamp: 12 x 7 cm  / 4.72 x 2.75”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 60 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used. For this setup a PAR38 spot light bulb was used.

Period: 1970s – 1980s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Targetti Sankey S.p.A., Via Pratese, 164, 50145 Firenze – Italy.

Other versions: Made in some slight variations over the years. Among other things, the logo of Targetti  has changed over the years. The logo used on this lamp dates from 1975 and was used until the 1980s.

Targetti Sankey S.p.A.

Targetti Sankey S.p.A. was founded in 1928 by Sankey Targetti as a family business. His son Paolo was the second president of the company. Today his grandson Lorenzo succeeded Paolo in the chairmanship of the group, and Stella, his granddaughter, is the vice president of the Tuscany RegionThe company has been designing and producing indoor and outdoor architectural light fixtures ever since.

The company specializes in lighting for large exhibition spaces. For example the lights used in the Galleria dell’Accademia di Firenze (Gallery of the Academy of Florence) to illuminate the world famous statue of David, made by Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475 – 1564), were a gift by Targetti for the museum. Also the Academy of Fine Arts (Accademia di Belle Arti) in Firenze is illuminated by Targetti.

Paolo Targetti

Paolo Targetti (1937 -2010) worked for the company since 1960 and has been working on the management’s commitments with an enthusiastic activity in the field of design of lighting and communication equipment. He was president of the Targetti Sankey S.p.A. company since 1985For some years Targetti was president of the L’Accademia di Belle Arti (Academy of Fine Arts) in Florence.

Targetti was appointed President of the Industrial Association of Florence (L’Associazione industriali di Firenze) in 1987, member of the “giunta nazionale di Confindustria”, the Confederation National Council, since 1991, runner of work since 1992, president of the scuola di Scienze Aziendali, the School of Business Science in Florence from 2003 to 2010.

From 2004 to 2007 he was chairman of the National Association of Lighting Manufacturers, the L’Associazione nazionale dei produttori di illuminazioneSince 2008 he was president of the Academy of Fine Arts in Florence.

Villa La Sfacciata

In 1998 Paolo Targetti and Targetti Sankey bought the Villa La Sfacciata in Firenze, Italy.  It houses the Fondazione La Sfacciata Lighting Academy, the home of the Targetti Light Art collection, headed by Amnon Barzel.

The Foundation is dedicated to promoting lighting research, the diffusion of light culture and commissioning works of art to contemporary artists made with the use of artificial lights. The Villa La Sfacciata is located in via Volterrana 82, on the hill of Giogoli, near the Certosa di Firenze.

Targetti: Philosophy, Product, Project

Kalmar Smoked Glass Chandelier

Carlo Nason

Carlo Nason

Born in Murano in 1935 he grew up in one of the oldest families of Murano glass makers where glass experts introduced him to the most refined techniques. Nason quickly started to collaborate with other glass workshops, with special attention for modern design and achieving a combination of technique and craftsmanship which characterizes all his projects.

Carlo Nason has always shown an attitude for innovation without losing his tradition. He has chosen AV Mazzega most of all in the 1970s and 1980s to develop the complete collection, that today is an icon of vintage: the creation of the highest quality at the level of its design.

Kalmar Smoked Glass Chandelier - Carlo Nason - labelKalmar Logo

Links (external links open in a new window)

Kalmar website

Mazzega 1946

Facebook Mazzega 1946

AV Mazzega – http://www.avmazzega.com – website offline since 2018
The Facebook page of AV Mazzega is gone since November 2017. Mazzega 1946 is the new name of the company.

History of Murano – Wikipedia

Murano Glass Museum website

Kalmar lamps on Vintageinfo

AV Mazzega lamps on Vintageinfo

Carlo Nason lamps on Vintageinfo

Kalmar Catalogue 1972 on Vintageinfo

Kalmar Catalogue 1974 on Vintageinfo

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Kalmar Smoked Glass Chandelier

 

Materials: Metal chromed frame. Aluminium parts and 3 hand blown Murano smoked crystal glass plates. Bakelite socket.

Cord Length: 75 cm / 29.52’’ – adjustable

Height: 40 cm / 15,75”

Width: ∅ 47 cm / 18.50”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 100 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb with an E27 screw base can be used, for this lamp  preferable a globe bulb.

Period: 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Carlo Nason.

Manufacturer: AV Mazzega, Murano, Italy.

Other versions: Also made as table lamp and wall light.

Chandelier made by AV Mazzega, Murano, Italy and designed by Carlo Nason. Produced for Kalmar Franken KG in Austria in the 1970s.

Today the company is named JT Kalmar GmbH and has two divisions; Classic and Kalmar Werkstätten for contemporary lighting.

Kalmar Franken KG

Founded in Vienna by Julius August Kalmar in the 1880s, Kalmar first specialized in the production of hand crafted objects of cast bronze. The company soon established its practice of closely collaborating with prominent architects to create chandeliers and other cast bronze objects in Austria, Europe and the United States. Before long it was presenting custom-made wares at international exhibitions such as the 1888 Vienna Trade Exposition (Gewerbeausstellung Wien). The 1893 Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition. The 1901 Export Exposition Scandinavia and the 1906 Austrian Exhibition in Earl’s Court, London.

Julius Theodor Kalmar

After the turn of the century, Julius Theodor Kalmar, son of the original founder, studied under the renowned Austrian architect and designer Josef Hoffmann at the Vienna School of Applied Arts and the Birmingham School of Art and Design. Inspired by Josef Hoffmann and the arts and crafts movement of the era, Julius pushed the company in a new direction away from the eclectic style of the late 19th century. And in 1925 Kalmar designs began selling in Haus und Garten, an avant-garde shop for home furnishings founded by architects and designers Josef Frank and Oskar Wlach. The shop was to become a main venue of modern Austrian interior and lighting design. It has a trademark in the promotion of Viennese design abroad.

By 1931, Kalmar was concerned solely with designing and manufacturing high quality lamps and fixtures in cooperation with the architects of the Austrian Werkbund, an association of artists, craftsmen, architects and manufacturers founded in 1912. Their purpose was the promotion of a high regard for material, form and function in the hand crafted as well as industrial production of fine art and applied arts. They sought modernity by combining classical tradition and contemporary innovation. Recognized as a typically Viennese style by the 1930s, this “moderate modernity” integrated the ornament-stripped purism of Adolf Loos with more traditional elements.

Julius Theodor Kalmar saw lighting fixtures as “quite humble things, which fit in and serve their purpose of functionally illuminating living spaces without glare — and that is what it all comes down to, as far as lamps are concerned as well as in all aspects of life: fitting in with the given framework and with the overall concept.”

Designers

Thanks to the younger Kalmar’s involvement and personal acquaintance with the leading European architects of the day, the name Kalmar became associated with high quality modern design. The company flourished, producing light fittings for prominent Austrian architects and designers including Frank and Wlach. As well as Oskar Strnad, Clemens Holzmeister, Oswald Haerdtl, Ernst Plischke, and others. As the company grew, the size and scope of its contracts increased. And soon it was producing chandeliers and major installations for clients such as the Vienna Opera, the Burgtheater, the new theaters in Linz and Salzburg and the Vienna stock exchange.

During the 1960s and 70s, Kalmar became increasingly involved in the production of decorative glass objects. Initially designed for the retail market, the company’s mouth-blown and molded relief glass elements offered vast decorating possibilities in large or small areas.

As a result, the demand for Kalmar installations grew steadily. The company became more widely known among international design and architecture professionals.

1990s until today

In the 1990’s, the great-grandson of the founder, Thomas Calice, shifted the company’s focus to international lighting projects. He phased out Kalmar’s own product lines and concentrated the company’s resources on the production of decorative, functional and technical lighting installations. The company has expanded in this specialized area and now produces prestigious custom designed and manufactured lighting installations throughout the world.

Lighting Installations

In recent years Kalmar has produced major lighting installations for government buildings and palaces, museums, theaters, hotels and cruise ships. These projects include the Presidential Palace of the Kremlin. The State Tretjakov Gallery in Moscow, the new Shanghai Grand Theater. Hotels including the Ritz Carlton in Berlin, Doha and Osaka. The Grand Hyatt in Dubai, the W-Hotel in Doha. Shangri-la hotels in Abu Dhabi, Beijing and Suzhou. The Hilton in Adelaide, Bahrain, Bangkok, London and Seoul and the Sheraton in Cairo, Frankfurt and Stockholm. As well as cruise ships such as Royal Caribbean International’s Voyager, Freedom and Genesis class ships and the Cunard Line’s RMS Queen Mary 2 and MS Queen Victoria. In addition to the Dubai and Jeddah Airports, the Burj Tower and the Qatar Education City Convention Center.

*In collaboration with Jonathan Browning Inc., a producer of highest quality lighting for interior designers and architecture firms, Kalmar Werkstätten, a sub brand of Kalmar, is currently offering reproductions of a series of seven historic designs based on Kalmar drawings to some of their American clients. Their distinct, simple elegance clearly evokes the essence and spirit of the Austrian Werkbund. Kalmar will also be marketing these designs in Europe, the Middle East and Asia. In addition, United Designers Ltd, an award winning, multidisciplinary consultancy based in London has adapted a selection of Kalmar designs for marketing in 2009. In march 2016 United Designers Ltd was dissolved after 22 years. Last accounts were made up to 31 March 2011.

Senior Desk Lamp

Other examples of this table lamp, with single or double lamp shade.

Senior Desk Lamp

Senior Desk Lamp

Senior Desk Lamp

Senior Desk Lamp

 

Materials: Thick chromed metal (iron and brass). Double acrylic lampshade in white and transparent green. White Bakelite sockets.

Height: 40 cm / 15.74”

Width: ∅ 30 cm / 11.81”

Electricity: 2 bulbs E27, 2 x 40 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used. Preferably small white/opaque round bulbs.

Period: 1960s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised, inspired by a Jo Hammerborg design.

Manufacturer: To be appraised.

Other versions: Also made with a single shade in white and black, probably also made in several other colours. This lamp is always for sale as a Fog & Morup lamp designed by Jo Hammerborg, but it is not.

The original has a glass (double) shade and is made in green or lilac and white and is 45 cm high and 33 cm wide. Just a little bit bigger than this one. (example of this beauty below)

The original Senior desk lamp appears for the first time in the Fog & Morup catalogue in 1966.

This lamp is a nice copy or interpretation in a high quality, maker unknown.

VLM Components

All the electric parts were produced by VLM Components in the 60s. The company was founded in 1945 in Buccinasco, a small village near Milan, Italy. The company became famous for the switches they produce since 1968, designed by Achille Castiglioni.
VLM is part of the Relco Group, founded in 1967. Today they are the owners of the brands RelcoLeuciRelco LightingVLM and Segno.

VLM Components switch

VLM Components 1960s switch

Fog & Morup original

Fog & Morup Senior Desk Lamp 1966 - Design Jo Hammerborg

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Senior Desk Lamp

Jo Hammerborg

Johannes (Jo) Hammerborg was born on 4 February 1920 in Denmark.
In 1957 he became head of design at Fog & Mørup. Hammerborg was a prolific designer, personally creating some 100 lamps for Fog & Mørup and also collaborated with other designers in adapting their designs. Jo retired in 1980, only a short time before both his own death and the demise of the company.

Links (external links open in a new window)

More info on the website of Jo Hammerborg

The story of Fog & Mørup, Danish modern lighting’s superstar

Fog & Morup lamps on Vintageinfo

OMI Chrome Desk Lamp

70s Fase Spain Chrome Desk Lamp - Catalogue picture

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OMI Chrome Desk Lamp

 

Materials: Chromed metal, Bakelite socket. Cast iron counterweight in the base. Aluminium chromed lampshade, white painted inside.

Height: 70,5 cm / 27.75”

Lampshade: ∅ 14 cm / 5.51”

Base:  16,7 cm / 6.57”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 75 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Sölken-Leuchten, Arnsberg, Germany.

Other versions: Also made as a double light floor lamp.

This desk lamp and the floor lamp was also sold by Fase, from Spain. On the left you see a picture from a 1974-1975 catalogue. Fase sold many lamps made by other companies. More Vintageinfo over here.

When you do a search on the internet for the OMI mark on the chromed knee joint, you always find lamps that are described as lights designed by Koch & Lowy for OMI. Koch & Lowy is not a design team, but an American light company and has got nothing to do with this lamp. Some say OMI Switserland, but there is nothing to be found about a Swiss company with that name. Others say OMI DBGM, because sometimes it is written on the knee joint.

DBGM is not some type of company, but it is German for utility model, “gebrauchsmuster” in German. Only used in Germany and Austria: Deutsches Bundes-Gebrauchsmuster. To say it simple, the knee joint is made by a company named OMI and the system is licensed for some period, most of the time 10 years: the small brother of a patent. 

Sölken-Leuchten

Josef Sölken GmbH & Co. KG Leuchtenfabrik was founded in january 1950 as a family business. Over the years they produced and sold many lamps. Many of them were also sold by Massive from Belgium. The company Sölken was declared bankrupt in 2001, it had been in trouble for some time. Sölken-Leuchten was a client of OMI and used OMI parts for most of their lamps with some joints in it.

The Briloner lighting company owned by the Hustadt family has taken over the high-voltage system and in the low-cost Soelken systems compatible systems. The rest of the company was acquired by S-Leuchten Verwaltungs GmbH, also from Arnsberg. Today Sölken-Leuchten is owned by Stefan Schraderfrom Lichtservice Schrader in Hamburg.

OMI

The OMI company is Otto Meinzer GmbH & Co Metallwarenfabrik from Iserlohn in Germany (Otto Meinzer Iserlohn). It is a manufacturer of chromed brass joints for the lighting industry. The joints are marked with the OMI mark. The company was founded more than 50 years ago. They never produced lighting.

The switch of this lamp has stamps that say that the switch is approved for use in Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Germany. 

OMI Chromed Desk Light

OMI Chromed Desk Light

Gaetano Sciolari Chrome Tubular Chandelier

Gaetano Sciolari Chrome Tubular Chandelier - Neolamp Italy Sirio Sattinata 220 volt - 25 Watt

Gaetano Sciolari Chrome Tubular Chandelier - Neolamp Italy Sirio Sattinata 220 volt - 25 Watt

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Gaetano Sciolari Chrome Tubular Chandelier

 

Materials: Chromed metal (iron and brass). Bakelite sockets.

Rod Length: 60 cm / 23.62”

Height: +- 35 cm / 13.77”

Width: ∅ 50 cm / 19.68”

Electricity: 10 + 3 bulbs E14 (2 circuits), 10 + 3 x 60 watt maximum, 110/220 volt. Any type of light bulb can be used, but preferably bulbs made by Neolamp, Italy. The company no longer exists. The name of the bulb is Sirio. They were made in white/opaque, clear and satin/frosted.

The bulbs used in this setup are the satin bulbs, the “Sirio Sattinata“. These incandescent light bulbs are hard to find these days, unfortunately. Today dimmable LED lamps are in production by the Dutch company Pope. You can buy them over here at Bol.com.

Period: 1960s, 1970s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: Angelo Gaetano Sciolari (1927-1994).

Manufacturer: Société Anonyme Boulanger, Liège, Belgium.

Other versions: Produced in a smaller version, as a floor lamp, a table lamp and a wall lamp. Also made in brass.

Angelo Gaetano Sciolari

Angelo Sciolari graduated with a degree in architecture but wanted to be a filmmaker. This course came to an abrupt end when in 1949 his father suddenly died and he took over the Sciolari Lighting company at the age of 22.

His first designs in the 1950s were Sputnik inspired pendants; off course it was the space age.

In the 1960s he created refined, futuristic and sharp classical style chandeliers. Lines were clean and sculptural and materials such as crystal and ice glass sparkled with a voluptuously luxurious coolness and he started combining brass with chrome.

He led the family business with a passionate vision and within years, he expanded the business and started working with other light companies worldwide.

Gaetano Sciolaricreated lights for Stilnovo and Stilkronen (Italy), Lightolier andProgress Lighting (USA), S.A. Boulanger (Belgium), Helestra and Leola (West Germany), Lyfa (Denmark) and some other companies and off course for his own Italian family business; the Sciolari company in Rome and Milan; were all the lighting business at that time was present.

Sciolari was the founder and the first president of the trade association of Italian manufacturers of lighting fixtures, the AIDI. The Associazione Italiana di Illuminazione was founded in 1958 and still exists today.

Boulanger

Unfortunately, not much is known about the company. S.A. Boulanger is famous for the large amount of lamps the company produced that are designed by Gaetano Sciolari. S.A. Boulanger ended business somewhere in the early 1980s. There is nothing to be found in the Belgian Official Journal about the company/factory. The journal goes back to 1983. The company is not to be confused by the other Boulanger company from Belgium: Les Ateliers Boulanger NV from Brussels. More info about the company over here.

VLM Components

All the electric parts were made by VLM Components. The company was founded in 1945 in Buccinasco, a small village near Milan, Italy. The company became famous for the switches they produce since 1968, designed by Achille Castiglioni.
VLM is part of the Relco Group, founded in 1967. Today they are the owners of the brands RelcoLeuciRelco LightingVLM and Segno.

Brass version, you can find this chandelier here on Vintageinfo.

Gaetano Sciolari Chrome Tubular Chandelier - Brass version

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