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Souvenir Lamps

Souvenir Lamps

Lighting produced to sell in touristic places. All vintage lighting from the 20th century. Biographies of the designers and histories of the companies. ID your vintage lamps!

Kérina Monaco Table Lamp

Ceramics from Monaco are relatively new, it began in 1874 with the first pottery. It started slowly but after the second word war it boomed, thanks to the success of the Vallauris ceramics. Well known companies are: Azureart, Céraflor, Ceramic, Ceramica, Cérart, Cérastyl, Cerdazur, Cermonac, Céroc, Kérina, Monacéram and Monazur.

Connoisseurs say that you can easily detect the difference between ceramics from Vallauris and Monaco. In the factories in both cities they made more or less the same pots and lights in this style. The Monaco ceramics have darker colours and are more detailed. You can see it on the examples shown on this page.

Vallauris Big Fish Ceramic Table Lamp
You can find this lamp here on Vintageinfo

Vallauris Big Fish Ceramic Table Lamp

Many thanks to Yoeri for lending this table lamp.

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Kérina Monaco Table Lamp

 

Materials: Ceramics, Brass with porcelain socket.

Height: 24 cm / 9.44”

Width: 16 cm / 6.29”

Base: 8.3 cm / 3.26”

Electricity: 1 bulb E14, 1 x 40 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used. But preferably the smallest you can get. 

Period: 1950s – 1960s.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Kérina, Principality of Monaco.

Other versions: Many versions, all with fish, shellfish and crustaceans, bright colours, typical for the 50s and 60s.

Ceramic art of the Côte d’Azur

The various centers of production are located in two departments of the Côte d’Azur: the Alpes-Maritimes, including the Principality of Monaco and the Var. Vallauris, in the Alpes Maritimes, has been and remains the most important production center of this region. They make ceramics for more than 2000 years, in Monaco only since 1874. After the second world war the ceramics became famous worldwide.

Pablo Picasso

In 1946 Pablo Picasso visited the city and became a potter. From that moment on, Vallauris will be the meeting place of the artistic aristocracy. Joan Miró, Henri Matisse, Raoul Dufy, Marc Chagall, Fernand Léger, Georges Braque, Jean Lurçat, Édouard Pignon, Tsuguharu Foujita, Jean Cocteau, Jean Marais, André Masson, Victor Brauner, all of whom, like the Master, will try their hand at ceramics.

This intellectual abundance attracts young people eager for adventure. They were named: Michel Anasse, Dominique Baudart, Marius Bessone, Frederique Bourguet, Roger Collet, Francine Delpierre, Jean Derval, Albert Diatto, Isabelle Ferlay, Marcel Giraud, Odette Gourju, Jacques Innocenti, Irène Kostanda, Alexandre Kostanda (her son), Jean-Claude Malarmey, Marius Musarra, Lubina Naumowitch, Robert Pérot, Gilbert Portanier, Placide Saltalamacchia “AEgitna”, Max Siffredi (known as Mabyjo’s), Piot Thiry, Albert Thiry, Gilbert Valentin, Lilette , Valdemar Volkoff and many others.

In 1960, there were about 150 workshops or factories in Vallauris, three times more than in 1920. In 1970, there were more than 200.

These lamps became very popular in the 1950s and 1960s, but you could find them until the late 1970s in souvenir shops along the coast throughout Europe. Some lamps and pots had labels on it with the name of the city were they were sold, as you can see on the pictures below.
The big fish has a label “Ostende”, written in French. Ostend is a coastal city in Belgium. Another one has “Le Lavandou” glued on it. Le Lavandou is some 150 km for Vallauris. 

Kérina Monaco Table Lamp - Signature

Vallauris Ceramic Table Lamp

Vallauris or Monaco Table Lamp?

Vallauris or Monaco Table Lamp?

Vallauris Table Lamp - Ostende

Vallauris Table Lamp - Le Lavandou

Vallauris Table Lamps Collection

Vallauris Table Lamps Collection

1950s Vallauris Seagull Table Lamp

Connoisseurs say that you can easily detect the difference between ceramics from Vallauris and Monaco. In the factories in both cities they made more or less the same pots and lamps with this decoration. The Monaco ceramics have darker colours and are more detailed. You can see it on the examples shown on this page. This seagull table lamp is a doubtful case. It is not signed but it’s got everything to be a lamp from Monaco, but it is probably not. 

1950s Vallauris seagull table lamp - Cermonac Monaco Table Lamp

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1950s Vallauris Seagull Table Lamp

 

Materials: Enameled colourful ceramics, Bakelite socket.

Height: 19 cm / 7.48”

Width: 23 x 20 cm / 9.05 x 7.87”

Electricity: 1 bulb E14, 1 x 20 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of lamp can be used, but preferably the smallest you can get. 

Period: 1950s – 1970s.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Made by many factories.

Other versions: Many versions, all with fish, shellfish and crustaceans. Bright colours, typical for the 1950s and 1960s.

Ceramic art of the Côte d’Azur: The various centers of production are located in two departments of the Côte d’Azur: the Alpes-Maritimes, including the Principality of Monaco and the Var.

Vallauris

Vallauris, in the Alpes Maritimes, has been and remains the most important production center of this region. They make ceramics for more than 2000 years. In Monaco only since 1874. After the second world war the ceramics became famous worldwide.

In 1946 Pablo Picasso visited the city and became a potter. From that moment on, Vallauris will be the meeting place of the artistic aristocracy. Joan Miró, Henri Matisse, Raoul Dufy, Marc Chagall. Fernand Léger, Georges Braque, Jean Lurçat. Édouard Pignon, Tsuguharu Foujita. Jean Cocteau, Jean Marais, André Masson. Victor Brauner, all of whom, like the Master, will try their hand at ceramics.

This intellectual abundance attracts young people eager for adventure. They were named: Michel Anasse, Dominique Baudart, Marius Bessone. Frederique Bourguet, Roger Collet, Francine Delpierre. Jean Derval, Albert Diatto, Isabelle Ferlay. Marcel Giraud, Odette Gourju, Jacques Innocenti, Irène Kostanda. Alexandre Kostanda (her son), Jean-Claude Malarmey, Marius Musarra, Lubina Naumowitch. Robert Pérot, Gilbert Portanier, Placide Saltalamacchia “AEgitna”. Max Siffredi (known as Mabyjo’s), Piot Thiry, Albert Thiry. Gilbert Valentin, Lilette, Valdemar Volkoff and many others.

In 1960, there were about 150 workshops or factories in Vallauris. Three times more than in 1920. In 1970, there were more than 200.

These lamps became very popular in the 1950s and 1960s, but you could find them until the late 1970s in souvenir shops along the coast throughout Europe. Some lamps and pots have labels on it with the name of the city where they were sold, as you can see on the pictures below.
One lamp has a label with “Ostende“, written in French. Ostend is a coastal city in Belgium. Another one has “Le Lavandou” glued on it. Le Lavandou is some 150 km for Vallauris. 

1950s Vallauris seagull table lamp - Vallauris Table Lamp - Ostende

1950s Vallauris seagull table lamp - Vallauris Table Lamp - Le Lavandou

1950s Vallauris seagull table lamp - Vallauris Table Lamp

1950s Vallauris seagull table lamp - Véritable Céramique de Vallauris

1950s Vallauris seagull table lamp - Vallauris Fish Table Lamp

1950s Vallauris seagull table lamp - Vallauris Starfish Table Lamp

1950s Vallauris seagull table lamp - Vallauris or Monaco Clam Table Lamp?

1950s Vallauris seagull table lamp - Vallauris or Monaco Clam Table Lamp?

1950s Vallauris seagull table lamp - Vallauris Table Lamps Collection

1950s Vallauris seagull table lamp - Vallauris Table Lamps Collection

Remembrance Flame Table Lamp

Remembrance Flame Table Lamp

 

Materials: Metal silver plated base. Maroon translucent plastic. Bakelite socket. Flame neon glow light bulb.

Height: 16 cm / 6.29”

Width: ∅ 5,5 cm / 2.16”

Electricity: 1 neon glow flame light bulb E14, 110/220 volt.

Period: 1930s until now.

Designer: Philip J. Kayatt designed the first light bulbs with this mechanism.

Other versions: Made in several variations, also sold with different bases over the years. Light bulbs were produced for 110 volt and for 220 volt. 

Manufacturers:  These type of light bulbs are made since the 1930s. They contain low pressure gas, either neon or argon, or a mixture of the two. In the bulb are metal sculptures coated with phosphors. These phosphors fluoresced when excited by glow discharge.

Several companies made light bulbs like this. One of the most famous is Aerolux. It was active from the 1930s until the 1970s. Philip J. Kayatt (1896-1975) was president of the company.

In Japan it was ABCO who made similar lamps. Today ABCO is owned by Westinghouse.

The flame light bulb of this lamp has only a stamp with 2200 on it. Maker unknown. Bulbs like this one were/are made by Brillanta and Ormalight, and probably some other companies.

Remembrance table lamps such as this one were sold in many tourist religious places such as the Vatican in Rome or places of pilgrimage such as Lourdes in France, Fátima in Portugal, Santiago de Compostela in Spain and so on. This lamp was made in the 1960s. Today religious/remembrance lamps in this style are still for sale, also online. 

Light bulbs with flowers, crucifixes, flames and other figures are also produced in China and are for sale on Chinese websites.

ABCO Light Bulb

Fleur de Light ABCO Light Bulb

Aerolux Light Bulb

Aerolux Flowers Light Bulb

Crucifix Table Lamp - Artful gas-discharge light bulbs

Fleur de Light ABCO Light Bulbs - Box

Fleur de Light ABCO Light Bulbs - Box

Artistica Murano Fish Table Lamp

Links (external links open in a new window)

Wikipedia Murano glass

Research for labels

20thcenturyglass
glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk
Muranozoo

Foundries

venetian-glass.info

Types of glass

Muranonet

Murano glass Faq

Muranoplace

Sommerso technique

Muranonet.com

Murano lamps on Vintageinfo

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Artistica Murano Fish Table Lamp

 

Materials: Crystal yellow, green and translucent hand blown Murano glass in the sommerso manner. It has gold flakes in the fins. Striking red fabric lampshade. Brass socket with a porcelain ring.

Total Height: 63 cm / 24.80”

Lampshade: ∅ 31 cm / 12.20”

Width Fish: 18 cm / 7.08”

Base: ∅ 13 cm / 5.11”

Height (glass with socket): 31 cm / 12.20”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 75 watt maximum, 110/220 volt. Any type of lamp can be used, not a specific one preferred. The switch is in the socket.

Period: 1950s, 1960s.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Artistica Murano CCC, Murano, Italy.

Other versions: Made in several colours, probably also with different lampshades.

Artistica Murano CCC made this lamp, the company no longer exists. Nothing to be found about it, except for some other old glass pieces. At some point the name was Cristallo Venezia CCC.

This fish lamp is made in the sommerso manner which became popular in the 50’s thanks to Flavio Poli who designed glass objects for Seguso Vetri d’Arte with delightful selections of colours, proficiently assisted by the hand of the master glassblower Angelo Seguso. The first sommerso items were those designed by Carlo Scarpa for Venini & Co. in the 1930’s.

Artistica Murano Table Lamp

Artistica Murano Table Lamp

Artistica Murano CCC label on this table lamp

Cristallo Venezia CCC label on a vase 

Artistica Murano CCC label

Cristallo Venezia CCC label

Collection of sommerso vases

Collection of sommerso vases

Horn Fish Table Lamp

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Horn Fish Table Lamp

 

Materials: Cow horn or some other bovine horn. White painted Bakelite socket. Some screws, fake plastic eye.

Height: 35 cm / 8.07”

Width: 22 cm / 2.16”

Base: 14,5 cm x 8 cm / 3.70”

Electricity: 1 bulb E14, 1 x 40 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb with an E14 socket can be used, preferably a small light bulb.

Period: 1950s – 1970s (this lamp).

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: To be appraised.

Other versions: Made in many forms and sizes.

These lamps were probably made since the time that electric light exists. They were for sale in souvenir shops in the coastal areas around the world.

Some say it is folk art, but they were produced on a massive scale. They were very popular in the 1950s and 1960s. These objects were made by craftsmen who clearly knew what they were doing, as can be seen in the smooth finish. The style varies according to the origin of the lamp.

This type of fish lamp is easy to find in Belgium, maybe it was made there. Not only lamps were made. Many fish exists without a lamp inside. You could find these lamps and other things made from cow horn for sale until the late 1970s. Many were made in the United Kingdom and Asia.

Horn craft still exists, you can find several shops online were the sell this type of art, newly made.

Horn Fish Table Lamp

Leaning Tower of Pisa Lamp

Leaning Tower of Pisa Lamp

 

Materials: Some type of resin, Bakelite socket.

Small version

Height: 20,5 cm / 8.07”

Width: ∅ 5,5 cm / 2.16”

Base: ∅ 9,4 cm / 3.70”

Big version

Height: 25 cm / 9.84”

Width: ∅ 7 cm / 2.75

Base: ∅ 10,5 cm / 4.13

Electricity: 1 bulb E14, 1 x 40 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb with an E14 socket can be used, preferably a small light bulb.

Period: 1960s, 1970s.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: To be appraised.

Other versions: Made in many sizes, with or without light bulb inside.

These lamps were probably made since the time that electric light exists. They are still for sale in souvenir shops in the Pisa area in the Tuscan region and cities were you find many tourists such as in nearby Florence in Italy. “Torre pendente di Pisa” is the Italian name for the Leaning Tower of Pisa. The building is the bell tower of the cathedral of the city of Pisa. The tower is famous worldwide for its unintended tilt. Construction of the tower occurred in three stages over 199 years.

The Leaning Tower of Niles is a half-size replica of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, located in Niles, Illinois, USA.

These table lamps were made in different sizes as you can see and produced by several factories. There are many different lamps for sale, today probably all made in China, so beware when you buy one. If it got old electric parts like these two lamps, they are more ore less 40 to 50 years old and in all probability made in Italy.

The electric parts of these 2 lamps are made by the Italian VLM Components company. The big version uses the model 450 switch designed by Achille Castiglioni in 1968. The small version has a VLM switch made before that time.

Leaning Tower of Pisa Lamp

Leaning Tower of Pisa Lamp

Leaning Tower of Pisa Lamp

Crucifix Table Lamp

Crucifix Table Lamp

 

Materials: Metal nickel-plated base, brass and porcelain socket. Crucifix neon glow light bulb.

Height: 17 cm / 6.69”

Width: ∅ 2,5 cm / 0.98

Base: ∅ 6 cm / 2.36

Electricity: 1 neon glow light bulb E27, 220 volt.

Period: 1930s until now.

Designer: Philip J. Kayatt designed the first lamps with this mechanism.

Other versions: Made in several variations, also sold with different bases over the years. Light bulbs were produced for 110 volt and for 220 volt. 

Manufacturers:  These type of light bulbs are made since the 1930s. They contain low pressure gas, either neon or argon, or a mixture of the two. In the bulb are metal sculptures coated with phosphors. These phosphors fluoresced when excited by glow discharge.

Several companies made light bulbs like this. One of the most famous is Aerolux. It was active from the 1930s until the 1970s. Philip J. Kayatt (1896-1975) was president of the company.

In Japan it was ABCO who made similar lamps. Today ABCO is owned by Westinghouse.

The crucifix bulbs like this one were/are made by Brillanta and Ormalight, and probably some other companies.

Crucifix lamps or remembrance lamps such as this one were sold in many tourist religious places such as the Vatican in Rome or places of pilgrimage such as Lourdes in France, Fatima in Portugal, Santiago de Compostela in Spain and so on. This lamp was acquired in Rome in the 1960s. Today religious/remembrance lamps in this style are still for sale, also online. 

Light bulbs with flowers and other figures are also produced in China and are for sale on Chinese websites.

ABCO Light Bulb

Fleur de Light ABCO Light Bulb

Aerolux Light Bulb

Aerolux Flowers Light Bulb

Crucifix Table Lamp - Artful gas-discharge light bulbs

Fleur de Light ABCO Light Bulbs - Box

Fleur de Light ABCO Light Bulbs - Box

Queen Conch Table Lamp

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Queen Conch Table Lamp

 

Materials: a queen conch placed on a brass rod on a Carara marble base. Bakelite socket.

Height: 33 cm / 12.99”

Width: 21 cm / 8.26”

Base: 7,8 x 7, 9 cm / 3.07 x 3.11”

Electricity: 1 light bulb E14, 1 x 40 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, but the smaller the better.

Period: 1970s.

Designer: To be appraised, these lamps are all handmade.

Manufacturer: To be appraised. In all probability made in Italy.

Many of them have their origin in the Caribbean, because the queen conch lobatus gigas – is edible and lives among others in that area. Conch meat has been consumed for centuries and has traditionally been an important part of the diet in many islands in the West Indies and Southern Florida.

The queen conch is mounted on a brass rod. The base is made of Carrara marble. A label is present, it says: Base Marble. Made in Italy. Genuine Carrara.

Maybe this lamp was sold in souvenir shops along the European coasts. The best place to buy shell lamps at that time. This lamp is a bit more posh than other lamps in this style thanks to the Carrara marble base and the brass rod. It is possible that this lamp was sold in design shops, because it was more expensive than a normal souvenir lamp. 

All the electric parts are from the late 1960s, early 1970s and made by VLM Components from Buccinasco near Milan in Italy. This lamp uses a switch designed in 1968 by Achille Castiglioni (1918 – 2002); the VLM 450 switch.

Queen Conch Table Lamp - label - BASE MARBLE, MADE IN ITALY GENUINE CARRARA

Queen Conch Table Lamp

Queen Conch Table Lamp

USSR Rocket Table Lamp

Links (external links open in a new window)

Yuri Alekseyecich Gagarin (Wikipedia)

History of rockets (Wikipedia)

Soviet space program (Wikipedia)

Russian Space Web, a website by Anatoly Zak, a Russian space historian and journalist.

The Soviet Space Program on the website of the CIA.

Cosmonaut and astronaut on Wikipedia

Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin

Yuri Gagarin

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USSR Rocket Table Lamp

 

Materials: Plastic, some metal parts, transformer, Bakelite parts.

Height: 38,5 cm / 15.15”

Base: ∅ 15,5 cm / 6.10”

Electricity: 1 bulb E10, 1 x 5 watt max, 6 volt. Works on 220 volt, but can be used on 110 volt, it is a normal transformer inside. When 110 volt is used the bulb should be 3 volt or it gives 2.5 watt.
It can also be used as a bedside lamp or night lamp.

Period: 1960s – Mid-Century Modern.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: To be appraised. Without any doubt a Russian state-owned company.

On the bottom of this table lamp is written ЦEHA, translated: Price. 16 00 P K. The P is Ruble the K is Kopecs. Ruble: The basic monetary unit of Russia and some other former republics of the Soviet Union, equal to 100 kopeks.

This table lamp is a propaganda souvenir to celebrate Russia’s victory in outer space with the launch of the first rocket around the earth with a cosmonaut; a human passenger. 

Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin (9 March 1934 – 27 March 1968) was the first human to journey into outer space, when his Vostok spacecraft completed an orbit around the Earth on 12 April 1961.

Russian propaganda milestone graphics

USSR Rocket Table Lamp

USSR Rocket Table Lamp

USSR Rocket Table Lamp

USSR Rocket Table Lamp

USSR Rocket Table Lamp - inside

USSR Rocket Table Lamp - bottom

Giant Clam Table Lamp

Giant Clam Table Lamp

 

Materials: Giant clam – Tridacna gigas. Pocillopora verrucosa or cauliflower coral. Bakelite socket. 

Height: 24 cm / 9.44”

Length: 27 cm / 10.62”

Width: 17 cm / 6.69”

Electricity: 1 light bulb E14, 1 x 60 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1980s.

Designer: These lamps are all handmade and designed by nature.

Manufacturer: To be appraised.

The shells have their origin in the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean.

In all probability this lamp was put together somewhere in Europe to be sold in souvenir shops in the touristic coastal areas in Europe. Most of these shells were imported from the Philippines.

The giant clam is the largest living bivalve mollusk and is one of the most endangered clam species. They can weigh more than 200 kilograms (440 lb), measure as much as 120 cm (47”) across, and they have an average lifespan in the wild of over 100 years.

VLM Components

All the electric parts were made by VLM Components in the 1980s. The company was founded in 1945 in Buccinasco, a small village near Milan, Italy. The company became famous for the switches they produce since 1968, designed by Achille Castiglioni.
VLM is part of the Relco Group, founded in 1967. Today they are the owners of the brands RelcoLeuciRelco LightingVLM and Segno.

The giant clam alive – Monsters of the Deep – National Geographic

Ricordo Di Pompei Table Lamp

Ricordo Di Pompei Table Lamp

 

Materials: Part of a shell (to be determined). Light blue painted aluminium base. Bakelite socket.

Height: 20 cm / 7.87”

Width: 14 cm / 5.51”

Base: 10,5 cm / 4.13”

Electricity: 1 bulb E14, 1 x 40 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used. But preferably the smallest you can get. 

Period: 1950s.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: To be appraised.

Other versions: Made in some variations.

Ricordo Di Pompei: Remember Pompeii, a religious souvenir.

Pompeii 

Pompeii was an ancient Roman town near Naples located at the base of Mount Vesuvius in Italy. The city and the surrounding area was mostly destroyed and buried under some 6 meter (20 ft) of volcanic ash and pumice in the eruption of the volcano in AD 79.

The nearby town Herculaneum was also destroyed. Pompeii and Herculaneum have been a tourist destination for over 250 years. Herculaneum is the least known of the two, but it has the most beautiful remnants.

Naples

Naples is the capital of the southern Italian region Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy after Rome and Milan with almost 1 million inhabitants (2017). It is located on the Amalfi Coast.

The city is well known for its historical museums. The Naples National Archaeological Museum (Museo archeologico nazionale di Napoli) is one of the city’s main museums. It has one of the most extensive collections of artefacts of the Roman Empire in the world. The second most important museum is the Museo di Capodimonte. It is one of the largest museums in Italy with mainly paintings and decorative arts.

Naples is the birthplace of the modern pizza. That certainly does not mean that you can eat a decent pizza over there. Most of the restaurants in the town are a tourist trap. Use at least TripAdvisor to guide you or you will be very disappointed. 

The best known designer from Napels is Willy Rizzo (1928-2013). Rizzo was born in Naples but he moved to France with his mother in the 1930s. 

Naples has a design museum, but it’s only about plastic, vintage and contemporary plastic. It is named Fondazioneplart (Fondazione/Foundation Plastic Art) in the Via Giuseppe Martucci, 48. A small museum, but it’s the best thing about design you can get in the city. Easy to reach with the subway. The exit is nearby in the “Stazione Napoli Piazza Amedeo“. 

Capri

Capri is the legendary island in the Bay of Naples. It was the playground of the jet set in the 1950s and 1960s. Today it is some resort and another tourist trap.

The Blue Grotto (Grotta Azzurra) is a good example. It takes you more than an hour to wait in small boats to visit the grotto. And suddenly in a few minutes you are back outside. It is a very small cave without stalactites. You have to pay for the boat that brings you over there along the coast and you’ll have to pay the entrance and a tip. 10 + 4 euro. Compared to the price of a beer in a bar in the harbor (8 euro) it’s OK…

The most famous song about the Island was by the French singer Hervé Villard. Capri C’est Fini” was a big hit in 1965. The song talks about a break-up of a relationship that had started in Capri.

Tickets for the fast boat to Capri cost 22,50 euro (2017). It takes you an hour to get there from Naples.

Despite everything, Capri has some of it’s old glamour left. A good example is this sputnik chandelier in a restaurant in the main street, as you can see below.

And last but not least: beware for pickpockets, they are everywhere.

Large Sputnik Chandelier Capri

Cermonac Monaco Table Lamp

Ceramics from Monaco are relatively new, it began in 1874 with the first pottery. It started slowly but after the second word war it boomed, thanks to the success of the Vallauris ceramics. Well known companies are: Azureart, Céraflor, Ceramic, Ceramica, Cérart, Cérastyl, Cerdazur, Cermonac, Céroc, Kérina, Monacéram and Monazur.

Connoisseurs say that you can easily detect the difference between ceramics from Vallauris and Monaco. In the factories in both cities they made more or less the same pots and lights in this style. The Monaco ceramics have darker colours and are more detailed. You can see it on the examples shown on this page.

Vallauris Big Fish Ceramic Table Lamp
You can find this lamp here on Vintageinfo

Vallauris Big Fish Ceramic Table Lamp

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Cermonac Monaco Table Lamp

 

Materials: Ceramics, Bakelite socket. Fabric lampshade.

Total Height: 42 cm / 16.53”

Height: 30 cm / 11.81”

Base: 18 cm / 7.08”

Electricity: 1 bulb E14, 1 x 40 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used. But preferably the smallest you can get. 

Period: 1950s – 1960s.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Cermonac, Principality of Monaco.

Other versions: Many versions, all with fish, shellfish and crustaceans, bright colours, typical for the 1950s.

Ceramic art of the Côte d’Azur

The various centers of production are located in two departments of the Côte d’Azur: the Alpes-Maritimes, including the Principality of Monaco and the Var. Vallauris, in the Alpes Maritimes, has been and remains the most important production center of this region. They make ceramics for more than 2000 years, in Monaco only since 1874. After the second world war the ceramics became famous worldwide.

Pablo Picasso

In 1946 Pablo Picasso visited the city and became a potter. From that moment on, Vallauris will be the meeting place of the artistic aristocracy. Joan Miró, Henri Matisse, Raoul Dufy, Marc Chagall, Fernand Léger, Georges Braque, Jean Lurçat, Édouard Pignon, Tsuguharu Foujita, Jean Cocteau, Jean Marais, André Masson, Victor Brauner, all of whom, like the Master, will try their hand at ceramics.

This intellectual abundance attracts young people eager for adventure. They were named: Michel Anasse, Dominique Baudart, Marius Bessone, Frederique Bourguet, Roger Collet, Francine Delpierre, Jean Derval, Albert Diatto, Isabelle Ferlay, Marcel Giraud, Odette Gourju, Jacques Innocenti, Irène Kostanda, Alexandre Kostanda (her son), Jean-Claude Malarmey, Marius Musarra, Lubina Naumowitch, Robert Pérot, Gilbert Portanier, Placide Saltalamacchia “AEgitna”, Max Siffredi (known as Mabyjo’s), Piot Thiry, Albert Thiry, Gilbert Valentin, Lilette , Valdemar Volkoff and many others.

In 1960, there were about 150 workshops or factories in Vallauris, three times more than in 1920. In 1970, there were more than 200.

These lamps became very popular in the 1950s and 1960s, but you could find them until the late 1970s in souvenir shops along the coast throughout Europe. Some lamps and pots had labels on it with the name of the city were they were sold, as you can see on the pictures below.
The big fish has a label “Ostende”, written in French. Ostend is a coastal city in Belgium. Another one has “Le Lavandou” glued on it. Le Lavandou is some 150 km for Vallauris. 

Cermonac Monaco Table Lamp - Tout fait main - "All by hand"

Cermonac Monaco Table Lamp - electric parts

Vallauris or Monaco Table Lamp?

Vallauris or Monaco Table Lamp?

Vallauris Table Lamp - Ostende

Vallauris Table Lamp - Le Lavandou

Vallauris Table Lamp

Vallauris Ceramic Table Lamp

Vallauris Table Lamps Collection

Vallauris Table Lamps Collection

Lighthouse Table Lamp

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Lighthouse Table Lamp

 

Materials: Brass and copper. Aluminium rotating fan inside. 2 mica glass plates. 1 translucent, one red for the lighthouse effect. Bakelite socket.

Height: 52 cm / 20.47”

Top: ∅ 12 cm / 4.72”

Base: ∅ 17 cm / 6.69”

Electricity: 1 bulb E27, 1 x 75 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, not a specific one preferred.

Period: 1950s – 1960s.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: To be appraised.

All the electric parts are 1950s Italian.

These lighthouses were sold along the European coast in souvenir shops. This one was acquired in Normandy, France. 

Probably for the first time sold in the 1950s, but produced for several years.

Lighthouse Table Lamp - inside the tower

Lighthouse Table Lamp - bottom of the base

Lighthouse Table Lamp - Switch from Italy

Lighthouse Table Lamp - plug

Sea Shell Souvenir Lamp

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Sea Shell Souvenir Lamp

 

Materials: A queen conch placed on top of a cone top shell. Bakelite socket.

Height: 23 cm / 9.05”

Width: 45 cm / 17.71”

Electricity: 1 light bulb E14, 1 x 40 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of light bulb can be used, but the smaller the better.

Period: 1950s – 1960s.

Designer: To be appraised, designed by nature.

Manufacturer: To be appraised.

Many of them have their origin in the Caribbean, because the queen conch lobatus gigas – is edible and lives among others in that area. Conch meat has been consumed for centuries and has traditionally been an important part of the diet in many islands in the West Indies and Southern Florida.

The queen conch is glued on a cone top shell, a member of the trochidae family – to be determined. Probably a species that lives in the same region.

The electric parts of this light are European and are the same as frequently used in other souvenir lamps such as the lights from Vallauris, France, also shown here on Vintageinfo. So probably these shells were imported in Europe to make those lamps. These lamps were sold in many souvenir shops on the European coasts since the end of the second world war, and probably sold around the globe.

Electric parts

Shell Souvenir Light

Vallauris Ceramic Table Lamp

Connoisseurs say that you can easily detect the difference between ceramics from Vallauris and Monaco. In the factories in both cities they made more or less the same pots and lights in this style. The Monaco ceramics have darker colours and are more detailed. You can see it on the examples shown on this page.

Cermonac Monaco Table Lamp

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Vallauris Ceramic Table Lamps

 

Materials: Enameled ceramics, Bakelite socket.

Height: 27 cm / 10.62”

Width: 41 cm / 16.14”

Electricity: 1 bulb E14, 1 x 40 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Any type of lamp can be used, but preferably the smallest you can get. 

Period: 1950s – 1970s.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: Made by many factories.

Other versions: Many versions, all with fish, shellfish and crustaceans. Bright colours, typical for the 1950s and 1960s.

Ceramic art of the Côte d’Azur: The various centers of production are located in two departments of the Côte d’Azur: the Alpes-Maritimes, including the Principality of Monaco and the Var.

Vallauris

Vallauris, in the Alpes Maritimes, has been and remains the most important production center of this region. They make ceramics for more than 2000 years. In Monaco only since 1874. After the second world war the ceramics became famous worldwide.

In 1946 Pablo Picasso visited the city and became a potter. From that moment on, Vallauris will be the meeting place of the artistic aristocracy. Joan Miró, Henri Matisse, Raoul Dufy, Marc Chagall. Fernand Léger, Georges Braque, Jean Lurçat. Édouard Pignon, Tsuguharu Foujita. Jean Cocteau, Jean Marais, André Masson. Victor Brauner, all of whom, like the Master, will try their hand at ceramics.

This intellectual abundance attracts young people eager for adventure. They were named: Michel Anasse, Dominique Baudart, Marius Bessone. Frederique Bourguet, Roger Collet, Francine Delpierre. Jean Derval, Albert Diatto, Isabelle Ferlay. Marcel Giraud, Odette Gourju, Jacques Innocenti, Irène Kostanda. Alexandre Kostanda (her son), Jean-Claude Malarmey, Marius Musarra, Lubina Naumowitch. Robert Pérot, Gilbert Portanier, Placide Saltalamacchia “AEgitna”. Max Siffredi (known as Mabyjo’s), Piot Thiry, Albert Thiry. Gilbert Valentin, Lilette, Valdemar Volkoff and many others.

In 1960, there were about 150 workshops or factories in Vallauris. Three times more than in 1920. In 1970, there were more than 200.

These lamps became very popular in the 1950s and 1960s, but you could find them until the late 1970s in souvenir shops along the coast throughout Europe. Some lamps and pots have labels on it with the name of the city where they were sold, as you can see on the pictures below.
The big fish has a label “Ostende“, written in French. Ostend is a coastal city in Belgium. Another one has “Le Lavandou” glued on it. Le Lavandou is some 150 km for Vallauris. 

Vallauris Table Lamp - Ostende

Vallauris Table Lamp - Le Lavandou

Vallauris Table Lamp

Vallauris Table Lamp - Véritable Céramique de Vallauris

Vallauris Table Lamp

Vallauris Table Lamp

Vallauris or Monaco Table Lamp?

Vallauris or Monaco Table Lamp?

Vallauris Table Lamps Collection

Vallauris Table Lamps Collection

Murano Drunk Clown Table Lamp

Murano clowns by master Dario in a shop in Venice, October 2014  

Murano Clowns Venice Italy 2014

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Murano Drunk Clown Table Lamp

 

Materials: Crystal hand blown Murano glass in many colours. Brass ring. Bakelite socket.

Height: 47 cm / 18.50”

Width: ∅ 14 cm / 5.51”

Electricity: 1 bulb E14, 1 x 60 watt maximum, 110/220 volt.
Not any type of lamp can be used. Preferably a small bulb, white/opaque or clear/bright.

Period: 1950s until now.

Designer: To be appraised.

Manufacturer: To be appraised.

These clowns were very popular from the 1950s to the 1970s. Many glass factories around the world made them. In Europe the were made in Murano, Italy, in Bodenmais, Bavaria, Germany by Joska, in the former Yugoslavian Republic and so on. Today they are also made in China.

The story goes that these clowns were made at the end of the day with the remnants of the glass. Other small pieces were also made in the evening.

All the electric parts of this clown lamp are from the 1960s and Italian and made by the VLM Company from Buccinasco, near Milan. Presumably this lamp is also Italian and made in Murano.

One of the most famous glass masters from Murano, Pino Signoretto (1944 – 2017) sometimes created a stunning clown. You can’t compare them off course, the clowns from mister Signoretto are refined art.

Murano Drunk Clown Table Lamp

Murano Drunk Clown Table Lamp

Murano Clowns collection

Clown made by glass master Pino Signoretto in 2014

Murano clown made by Pino Signoretto in 2014